LINCOLN COUNTY OBITUARIES

                           1885 through 1893

                          Submitted by Marge Womach

 

Obituaries are taken from newspapers, probates, funeral home ledgers, and the county death register. 

These obituaries are listed chronologically, NOT alphabetically.  

  To search: Use your edit key, find in page to search for a surname

           This is NOT a complete listing, but a work in progress. Submit your relative to  the Lincoln County Co-ordinator

                  

 

 

Jan 9, 1885 NW Tribune

 Mrs Esther C Warren

"Died. Warren—At Greenwood, seven miles north of Deep Creek Falls, Spokane Co, WT (Wash. Territory) on Dec 25, 1884, Mrs Esther C Warren, aged 65 years. She was a native of Virginia, and while a girl joined the Baptist Church and was a member up to her death. She moved from Virginia to Missouri where she was married in 1865. Together with her husband, H E Warren, they crossed the plains to Walla Walla, where they lived until 1879 when they moved to Spokane Co. In July 1884 at the same place at the age of 65 her husband died. She was sick but six weeks, leaves a large family and many friends to mourn her loss. Walla Walla papers please copy. J H Warren." (NW Tribune: 1-09-1885)

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     Jun 12, 1885-NWT  

Son of F Larne

“F Larne and family from Oregon have been visiting his brother at Brents in the Big Bend, where he had intended to locate.  While there a serious accident befell a 5-year old boy of his.  The boy looking around what new to find, went into the cellar where he found some giant powder caps. Knowing what a gun cap was like and hot it would explode, he concluded to try one of the giant caps, so he took one upstairs with him, also procuring a hatchet, having everything ready he hit the cap with the hatchet, and naturally had to stand the consequence. The cap exploded tearing the flesh from the lower part of his limbs, some pieces going into the upper part of…” (excerpt: NW Tribune: 6-12-1885)

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Nov 25, 1887

Chas Henry Pryor

Pryor.—Near Davenport, Nov 13, 1887, Chas Henry Pryor, of typhoid malaria fever, aged 32 years.  Mr. Pryor was the acting superintendent of schools of Lincoln County, which office he was holding a second term.  (NW Tribune) 

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Nov 8, 1888

Mr. O. Harris

Died at Ritzville, Sunday afternoon, Nov 4, 1888, Mr. O Harris, aged about 30 years. Mr. Harris was a brother of Mrs. G W Cannon of Sprague and the cause of his death was typhoid fever, from which he had been ill about 6 weeks. Deceased leaves a wife and three children to mourn his loss. They will shortly return to their old Tennessee home. (Sprague Herald)

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Nov 8, 1888

Mrs. F. M.  Ewell

Died, on Tuesday, Nov 6th, 1888 at Larene, Mrs. F. M. Ewell, of inflammation of the bowels. (Sprague Herald)

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Nov 8, 1888

Dr. J. S. Smith

Dr. J. S. Smith, the old and popular Sprague physician, died at his rooms in this city, yesterday about noon. The doctor had only been confined to his room about a week. His death was caused by pneumonia with various complications. During his brief illness Drs Olds and Mengle rendered him all the attention possible. During the past year or there-abouts, Dr. Smith’s wife and one of his children had died. One child remains now entirely an orphan. (Sprague Herald)

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Apr 4, 1889

Mrs. Clarisse E. Frink

Mr. Clarisse E. Frink, the aged mother of Mr. Wm E Frink of Minnie Falls, died at the residence of her son on Wednesday, the 27th inst.  Deceased was 73 years of age and had been ill for some time. The remains were interred in the cemetery at this city (Lakeview-Sprague) on Thursday and were followed to their last resting place by a large concourse of relatives and friends. Rev W T Koontz of the Sprague M E Church officiating. Mrs. Frink bore her suffering with the fortitude of a true Christian and gave evidence that the God in whom she trusted was her stay until the close of life. (Sprague Herald)   

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Apr 11, 1889
James Lee

Mr. James Lee, died at the residence of Frank Ringuet last Friday, April 5th, at the age of 79 years. Mr. Lee was one of the oldest settlers in this county and his death will be regretted by a large circle of friends. (Sprague Herald-page 5)   

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Apr 11, 1889

C. C. Whitney (committed)

A young man twenty-two years of age, named C. C. Whitney, was examined by Judge of Probate Brock and Dr. W. H. Olds, yesterday, and committed to the asylum at Steilacoom on the charge of insanity. (Sprague Herald-page 5)  

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April 18, 1889

Mr. C. Misner

Mr. C. Misner, of the firm of Misner & Holland, this city, died at his residence about ten miles from Sprague Tuesday afternoon. Mr. Misner had been suffering from heart trouble for the past two years, but had been able to be around the most of the time up to about a couple of weeks ago. Deceased was about 58 years of age and had been a resident of Washington Territory for over twelve years. He was a man of strong religious impulses and has always been an active worker in God’s vineyard. The funeral services will be held today at 10 o’clock from the late residence of deceased, Rev W T Koontz officiating, and the remains will be interred in the cemetery of his neighborhood. (Sprague Herald-page 5)

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May 9, 1889

Mr. Mercer

Funeral services will be conducted by Rev. W. T. Koontz at the Masonic Hall next Sunday morning at 11 AM, upon the decease of Comrade Mercer. The deceased arrived here lately from Indiana, and left his family here while he visited the Big Bend; while absent he was taken sick and died. A son who accompanied him brought the remains to this city, where they were immediately buried in the Lake View Cemetery, it not being possible to preserve them in condition to hold services over them on account of the weather. As Mr. Mercer was a member of the Grand Army his comrades in this city have taken the necessary steps for the funeral services to be held as above. The members of the Post will march to the Masonic Hall in body as also will troop A., W.N.G. (Sprague Herald-page 5)  

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May 23, 1889

child of Mr. Logan

A child of Mr. Logan died on last Monday and was buried in our new cemetery, it being the second burial in it. Mr. McDonald should, and doubtedly does, receive the thanks of the people for the gift of so beautiful a lot for the cemetery. (Sprague Herald-page 4, Rockdale Column)  

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May 23, 1889

S. L. Coon

Fatal Accident.—Mr. S. L. Coon, an old soldier, who served with the First Oregon Cavalry, during the late war, was knocked down and run over by a horse and fatally injured, although at the time his friends did not think he was seriously hurt, from the fact that he did not complain of great pain, but after several days he was not improving as was thought he should, so he was brought from his home in Grand Coulee to the hospital in this city where he lingered in great pain for a few days and on the 18th, quietly passed away. Thus from one cause or another our comrades are carried to the silent city of the dead to rest from their troubles and disappointments. (Sprague Herald-page 4, Wilbur Item)

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May 30, 1889

John H. Butler

Died.—At his residence in Sprague the 25th of May, 1889, of blood poison, resulting from amputation of leg and inward hurts occasioned by his fall on the 2nd of this month, John H Butler, aged 32 years.  Mr. Butler was born in Davis County, Missouri, in 1857, and with his now surviving brother came to Washington Territory in the year 1884 and has resided at his late residence till his death. He was a member of the ME Church and was much interested in the erection of the new church. He was an honest, industrious young man and one that was highly respected by all, especially those who knew him best. In his long and sore affliction he was patient and gave assurance of his trust in God and died in full hope of everlasting life. He leaves three sisters also to mourn his death. His funeral was among the largest ever in Sprague; the services were held by his pastor and his remains laid away to rest to await the union of friends that now mourn where sorrow will be no more. Pastor M E Church: Rev. W. T. Koontz. (Sprague Herald-page 5)

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June 13, 1889

Mrs. Jennie Turbush

Died, ten miles south of Sprague, at her residence, Mrs. Jennie Turbush, June 8, 1889, of consumption, aged 42 years. She leaves a husband and two sons. She was a member of the Christian church, was a good wife and mother and as a neighbor will be much missed. Her funeral sermon was preached by the writer to a large number of people and her remains were deposited on the home place. The family have the sympathy of the community, Wm T Koontz, pastor of ME Church of Sprague. (Sprague Herald-page 5)  

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June 20, 1889

Mrs. William Norris

The Waterville Immigrant of June 8th, says: The wife of Wm Norris committed suicide by shooting herself in the breast with a revolver at her home near the Davenport stage road between Moses and Grand Coulee, about 8 o’clock last Tuesday morning. Her husband was in the chicken house near by at the time, and did not hear the report of the pistol. The weapon used was a 32 caliber revolver and the bullet ranged downward, producing immediate death. She leaves two small children and a third confinement was approaching. She had told one of her neighbors, Mrs. Davis, that she was tired of life and intended to commit suicide. Domestic trouble and jealousy seem to have been the prime causes of the act. She was about 28 years old. The scene of the tragedy is about 38 miles east of Waterville. (Sprague Herald-page 5)

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July 25, 1889

P. H. McGrath

On last Sunday morning at 8:25 Conductor P H McGrath breathed his last after an illness of one month. Mr. McGrath complained of feeling ill for several days before he was confined to his house and when finally compelled to remain at home for treatment it was generally supposed that he was merely suffering from a bilious attack from which there was no occasion for alarm. Dr R M Houck was called upon to attend the sick man and soon announced that he was to have a run of the typhoid fever. An experienced nurse was secured and together with the constant attention of a loving wife and skillful physician, the battle for life was fought from day to day. While hope never died as long as a breath of life existed, there were for many days grave doubts as to whether the sick man would recover. On Sunday morning, in the presence of his wife and attendants, all that was mortal of P H McGrath passed into the hereafter. Conductor McGrath was 35 years of age, was born in Buffalo, NY, and leaves a devoted wife to mourn his untimely taking off. He was a member of the order of Knights of Pythias and received every attention during his illness from the lodge in this city, as well as from his associates in the railroad employ, and other friends. On Monday afternoon the funeral services were conducted under the directions of the Knights of Pythias, the remains being interred in Lake View Cemetery. (Sprague Herald-page 1)  

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Aug 1, 1889

Wm Keenan

Died.—This morning Mr. Wm Keenan who has been sick for the past two weeks, passed away. He was an old shop employee and was respected by all. He was a member of the G A R Post of this city and will be buried tomorrow at 9 AM from the Catholic Church under the auspices of the Post. (The Sprague Herald-page 1)  

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Aug 15, 1889

Charles A. Inkster

Charles A Inkster, one of the publishers of the Spangle Record, aged 23 years, died of typhoid fever at the home of his father, Hon. John Inkster of Egypt precinct, this county on Tuesday, ____. His remains were interred the following Thursday. Although the writer never had the pleasure of an actual acquaintance with the deceased we cannot but feel that the press has lost a valuable member. The Herald extends to the bereaved relatives its heartfelt sympathies. (Sprague Herald-page 1)  

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Sept 5, 1889

Annie Wynhoff  & sister

J. H. Friedlander informs the Herald of a terrible drowning accident which occurred Sunday evening of last week at Hell Gate, on the Columbia River, in which Miss Annie Wynhoff and a younger sister lost their lives. The two girls, accompanied by their father, were endeavoring to cross the river in a canoe, when they were carried into a whirlpool and their craft upset. Mr. Wynhoff was rescued barely alive. Searching parties found the younger child, but the remains of Miss Annie had not been recovered at last accounts. The family is well known and respected throughout this county and Mr. Wynhoff formerly conducted a store at Sherman. (Sprague Herald-page 1)  

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Nov 7, 1889

George Thompson

George Thompson, formerly an employee of the railroad shops here, died early yesterday morning at Little Creek in this county. He will be buried at Harrington tomorrow by the Masons of which order he was a member. (Sprague Herald-page 1)  

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Nov 14, 1889

“Dago Frank”

“Dago Frank,” the Italian vagabond, who was driven out of this city about three months ago, was shot and killed at Spokane Falls on Wednesday of last week by Thomas Eldridge in self-defense. Deputy Sheriff Fred Lee of this county was present, witnessed the shooting and arrested Eldridge. Lee’s friends in Lincoln County should be grateful to him that he did not act more promptly as the world is well rid of a worthless character. The coroner’s jury found that the circumstances attending the shooting were of an extenuating character. (Sprague Herald-page 3)  

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Nov 21, 1889

Geo Ewart

Mr. Geo Ewart, an old gentleman who has been engaged in the fruit and confectionery business in this city for some time, expired suddenly while sitting in a chair in his store Tuesday evening. He was past 64 years of age. Heart disease was the cause of his death. The funeral was held in the Methodist church yesterday and the remains were laid away in Lake View Cemetery. (Sprague Herald-page 3)  

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Dec 19, 1889

Thomas Click

About 9 o’clock Monday forenoon Thomas Click, a Whitman County farmer, was shot down in cold blood in front of the city hall in Colfax by a notorious character named Ben Blanton. He also attempted to kill two men who were with Mr. Click. The murderer was arrested. (Sprague Herald-page 3)  

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Dec 26, 1889

Wm E. Chandler

Comrade William E. Chandler suddenly passed away Saturday last at his residence on Second near E Street, in the city. Mr. Chandler had been ailing for a number of years from that dreadful disease, consumption, and to his wife and other intimate friends his passing away was not a surprise; but to those who did not intimately know him he appeared a healthy old man. Mrs. Chandler is left alone in the world, having

 no children to assist her in carrying her burden of grief. The deceased served in the 211th regiment of Pennsylvania volunteer infantry in the war of the rebellion, and was an honored soldier. He was born in Warren County, PA, Sept 20, 1827, and was raised in the same neighborhood with Mrs. Chandler. He moved to Michigan after the close of the war, and came to Washington in 1877, and located on Crab Creek, in this county, where his home has since been until a short time since when they moved to this city. Philo Buckman Post GAR of which he was a member took charge of the last obsequies of the deceased, and were followed to the cemetery by many citizens. Rev. Mr. Koontz officiated, and delivered a most suitable sermon upon the occasion. (Sprague Herald-page 3)

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Jan 16, 1890

Engineer W. J. Melcher

Monday evening last a number of N P engineers, together with other friends, congregated at the residence of the late Engineer Melcher to pay a last tribute to his remains before shipment East. Mrs. Pennington, Mrs. Evans, Mrs. Campbell, Mrs. Blunt, Mrs. Thomas Block and Mrs. Dr Putman were present. Rev Dr Koontz officiated, and paid a most beautiful tribute in language which carried a deep impression to the hearts of all present. Even the eyes of the sturdy men of the throttle moistened into tears as the pathetic words fell from the lips of the reverend gentleman. Upon the conclusion of these services, and upon the suggestion of Rev Koontz, the party made their way to the residence of the late Fireman Burroughs where they took a long and lasting farewell of what was left earthly of this unfortunate man. The ladies have been generally kind in administering consolation to the grief stricken families of Engineer Melcher and Fireman Burroughs. (Sprague Herald-page 3)  

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Jan 16, 1890

Fireman Burroughs

Engineer Melcher

Thursday of last week the rotary snow plow was ushered east through Sprague. It was dispatched to Cheney and from thence to clear the track of the Washington Central Railway, which line was blocked by numerous snow drifts. At Cheney the rotary plow was attached to engine 100, with the large engine, 447, as a pusher. After leaving Cheney and proceeding some twenty miles it was noticed that on account of the unevenness of the track the rotary plow was breaking its knives, and was hence incapacitated for the performance of the work for which it was intended to accomplish. At a side track, the name of which we have not learned, the rotary plow was dropped on account of its crippled condition, and the two engines with a caboose attached, proceeded on their way to clear the track of snow. When about half way between Davenport and Wilbur a heavy snow bank was encountered, and engine 100, plunging into the huge pile of solid snow, broke the attached plow. It was then agreed by the engineers and conductor that a back up should be made to the nearest switch, four miles distant, for the purpose of changing engines and placing the 447 in front, which engine also carried a snow plow. A large bank of snow, about six miles this side of Wilbur, had been previously encountered, and the engineers of 447 and 100 concluded to make a run for it, and, if possible, to break through and clear the road. This heavy embankment was immediately located upon a short curve in the road, with a rising hill upon one side, and a declining precipice upon the other, and when engine 447, with a three foot plow attached, struck the heavy embankment of frozen snow the outside rail gave way and the engine left the road bed and turned upon its side. Engine 100 also derailed itself.... (Sprague Herald-page 3)  

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Jan 16, 1890

Mrs. Jennie Bruce

Mrs. Jennie Bruce died suddenly on Sunday last. From the attending physician, Dr R M Houck, we learn that strangulation, super induced by a heavy attack of influenza, was the chief cause of her demise. Mrs. Bruce was buried from the Congregational church Tuesday afternoon. Engineer Bruce has the sympathy of the community in the loss of his young wife. (Sprague Herald-page 3)  

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Jan 16, 1890

son of T. M. Cooper

It is with unusual sadness that the editor of the Herald feels in being called upon to chronicle the sudden death of the infant son of County Auditor T. M. Cooper at the family residence in this city about 4 o’clock last Friday morning after a short illness of the prevailing complaint, which developed into congestion of the lungs despite the strenuous efforts of the mother... (Sprague Herald-page 3)  

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Jan 23, 1890

Mrs. Mary E. Smith

Mrs. Mary E. Smith, who died at her home ten miles south of Sprague last week and was buried in the Lake View Cemetery, last Wednesday, was the mother of Mrs. J. M. Brown of this city. Mrs. Smith was born on June 20, 1825, in North Carolina. She was a member of the Methodist church for a long time and was a member of the Christian church for 14 years. W T Koontz officiated at the burial. (Sprague Herald-page 3)  

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Jan 29, 1890

Jacob H. Miller

Last Sunday morning at 6:30 o’clock, Engineer Jacob H. Miller died at his residence in this city, after an illness of some weeks duration. Funeral services were conducted on Tuesday at the late residence of deceased by Rev W T Koontz, after which the remains were escorted to the depot by Red Cross Lodge, Knights of Pythias, and shipped to Portland, Oregon, for interment, being accompanied by the bereaved widow. Jacob H Miller was born in Columbia County, PA, and was 53 years of age. He leaves to mourn his loss a sorrowful widow and two adopted children. He was a respected member of the order of Knights of Pythias. He was a member of the endowment rank of the above order which entitles his widow to an insurance of $2000. (Sprague Herald-page 3)  

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Feb 20, 1890

F. O. Thorp

F.  O . Thorp, Esq., who has been quite sick for ten days died at the law office of N.  T.  Caton at 2 o’clock AM, Wednesday. Attorney Thorpe came to Sprague from Helena, Montana, about 5 months ago and located in the practice of his profession, occupying desk room in the office with Judge Caton. He came to Montana from his native state of Wisconsin where he had held offices of trust, and was for a number of years a member of the senate of that state. He leaves a wife here and a son in Montana. (Sprague Herald-page 3)(see May 6, 1890)  -

Feb 27, 1890

Walter Craven

Walter Craven died at his residence in this city from consumption last Thursday. Funeral services were conducted at the late residence of deceased on Friday by Rev W T Koontz. Deceased left to mourn his loss a wife and two children, besides a large number of relatives and friends in Iowa, from which state he came to Sprague. (Sprague Herald-page 3)  

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March 6, 1890

F. O. Thorpe

The remains of the late F. O. Thorpe were buried from Jones’ undertaking rooms Tuesday. His brother, Dr. Thorpe, chief physician for the Missouri Pacific system of railways, when notified of the death of his brother, telegraphed Sheriff Fish to have the deceased body embalmed and await further orders. The sheriff Monday received a telegram from Dr. Thorpe that on account of self illness he could not come, and ask that the body be interred here for future removal to its former home in the East. (Sprague Herald-page 3)  

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March 6, 1890

Lawrence Inkster

Lawrence Inkster, late editor of the Spangle Record, died at the home of his father in this county and was consigned to his tomb on Tuesday of last week. This is the second son that has been lost to the father and mother within an incredible short space of time. Mr. John Inkster and family have the full sympathy of the Herald in their sad bereavement. (Sprague Herald-page 3)  

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March 13, 1890

son of Thomas Langford

The little son of Mr. & Mrs. Thos Langford passed away Thursday, 6th, and was buried Saturday. A relapse from typhoid fever was the cause of death. (Sprague Herald-page 3)  

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March 13, 1890

Alfred Anderson

A coroner’s inquest, in which voluminous testimony was taken as to the cause of the death of Alfred Anderson, the fireman who lost his life in the collision at the stock yards, was held last week. The testimony elicited that blame could attach to no one, a dense fog existing at the time of the collision and the train with which the switch engine collided being a special, its advance into the yard being unknown to Engineer Moore, of the yard engine.

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March 12, 1891

Miles McMillen of Earl district

“Miles McMillen served all through the Civil War and died in Lincoln County, on March 12, 1891.” Quoted from Big Bend History-1904; (Confirmed by location of tombstone, McMillen Cemetery, 17 April 1832—12 Mar 1891)  

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Oct 9, 1891

Anna Christine Wagner

Anna Wagner

Robert Cosmos Wagner

Charles Jacob Wagner

(Details taken from Wilbur Register, fire victims: Anna Christine Wagner was born in Wurtemberg, Germany on Sept 1, 1852. She moved to Call Co, MO at the age of 19, married Damian Wagner at the age of 20. She had 9 children, all of which survive her. She died Oct 4, 1891 at the age of 39 yrs 1 mo 4 dys.  Anna Wagner was born in Wilson Creek, WA on March 7, 1881 and died Oct 4, 1891 at the age of 10 yrs 6 mos 25 dys. Robert Cosmos Wagner was born Dec 26, 1885 at Wilson Creek, WA and died Oct 5, 1891. Charles Jacob Wagner was born Dec 24, 1887 and died Oct 4, 1891.

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Nov 04, 1891

George Turner

“George Turner. Died: 4 Nov 1891, Spokane, WA. Age: 27 years. Cause: Nephritis. Burial: Greenwood Cemetery.”( Spokane County Death Return) 

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20 Oct 1893

Victor Fares? 

Judge Mount has been officially advised that Victor ?Fares?, sent to the Medical Lake insane asylum from Lincoln County, June 21, 1891, died on the 7th inst, the cause of death being stated as cerebral hemorrhage. (LCT)  

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Nov 3, 1893

Mrs. Moses Mullett

of Sprague

Mrs. Moses Mullett died after a short illness of heart disease, Oct 24th. The funeral was held at St Mary’s Church, Friday. (Sprague Sparks column of LCT)  

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Nov 3, 1893

Mrs. Mary Rodgers

Mrs. Mary A. Rodgers, who will be remembered by many of the old settlers north of Davenport as Miss Mary Huffman, died the 15th of Oct at her home is Los Gatos, CA, aged 27 years and 9 months. (LCT)  

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Nov 24, 1893

“son” of C. H. Neal

The eleven year old son of C. H. Neal, who has been sick for several weeks, died last Friday. The funeral took place at the residence, Sunday, at 10 o’clock. (Sprague Sparks of LCT)  

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Nov 24, 1893

David Kik

David Kik, a well known farmer near Davenport who has been quite unwell for several months past, died last Thursday and was buried on Sunday. (LCT)  

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Dec 1, 1893

Mr. & Mrs. John Dougherty

The man John Dougherty, who killed his wife near Waterville a few weeks ago, and who died himself from the effects of “Rough on Rats” administered by his unloving spouse, was a much married man, having had three wives, but his last wife had also had three husbands, so that honors were about even on that score.(LCT)

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Dec 15, 1893

Engineer Joseph Shinski

Fireman Wallace

             Spokane, Dec 8.—Two fatal wrecks happened on the Great Northern railroad last night, at least three lives being lost… Train No 16 was standing at the water tank at Edwall, about 40 miles west of here. Train No 15, expecting a clear track, came along from the east and dashed into the standing train. Engineer Joseph Shinski and Fireman Wallace were instantly killed. When 100 yards away Shinski saw the train standing in his way and whistled for down brakes. It was too late. The two engines piled up and were thrown 20 feet from the track. Two oil cars were immediately behind the tender of No 13. The oil caught fire and the wreck was soon in flames. Shinski’s body was found under the wreck. The fire immediately surrounding him was extinguished and the body recovered, the upper part burned beyond recognition. Wallace’s body was not scorched by the flames. The oil tanks burst and the fire consumed five cars. The bodies of the two men were brought here this morning.

 

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Submitted to the Lincoln County Washington GenWeb on September 23, 2005

by Marge Womach

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