LINCOLN COUNTY OBITUARIES

                           1894 through 1896

                          Submitted by Marge Womach

 

Obituaries are taken from newspapers, probates, funeral home ledgers, and the county death register. 

These obituaries are listed chronologically, NOT alphabetically.  

  To search: Use your edit key, find in page to search for a surname

           This is NOT a complete listing, but a work in progress. Submit your relative to  the Lincoln County Co-ordinator

                  

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June 29, 1894

Jacob Breidenberg

Spokane, June 23.—Jacob Breidenberg, a farmer living near Medical Lake was foully assassinated several days ago. His body lay in the cabin until yesterday morning when neighbors burst in the door and discovered the man. At full length on the floor and fully dressed, lay the body, with a vest throw over the face. The assassin had put three bullets through the brain of his victim, laid out the corpse, concealing the evidence of his work by the garment mentioned, and calmly proceeded to search the apartment for money supposed to be concealed therein. When he had finished his search he carefully locked the door, took the key with him and disappeared. The murdered man was known to have a pistol in his possession and the caliber of the bullets found at the inquest correspond with those of this weapon. The weapon has also disappeared, and it is possible that it was turned against its owner…..Breidenberg was a thrifty and well-to-do farmer, 40 years of age, a bachelor, who came here from Iowa. He was American born, but of German descent..(LCT)  

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June 29, 1894-accident

“son” of Wm Gray

The 14 year old son of William Gray, while plowing between Creston and Wilbur last Monday, was dragged under the horses’ feet and his head badly cut.  

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June 29, 1894

“son” of John Moylan

The little 3-month old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Moylan, of Bachelor Prairie, died Wednesday of some infantile trouble and was buried in the cemetery near town.  

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July 6, 1894-missing

J. H. Abbott

J H Abbott, who worked as night engineer at the Wilbur will last winter, is supposed to have committed suicide by drowning at Condon’s ferry on the Columbia about two weeks ago. He was tracked to the water’s edge, and has not been seen or heard of since. Abbott was not a drinking man, and had met with no recent reverses or trouble, but it is supposed he was despondent over his inability to obtain employment. (LCT)  

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July 13, 1894

“daughter” of Krogstrait

The little three-year-old daughter of Mr. Krogstrait, Sprague, died of scarlet fever this week Sunday. She was buried Monday forenoon. (LCT)  

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July 13, 1894

Charlie Lynch

Charlie Lynch, alias John Knox, who was run over by a train last week Wednesday at Sprague, died at 6:30 Thursday evening. He never recovered from the shock sufficient to warrant the amputation of his limbs, both of which would undoubtedly have had to been taken off above the knees. He was taken in charge by Undertaker Jones last Friday and given burial. (LCT)  

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July 27, 1894

John Butler

John Butler, formerly night yardmaster in Sprague, was killed by a train in Leadville, Colorado, July 3d. He was buried on the 7th inst. (LCT-Leader)  

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Aug 3, 1894

Robert Mitchell

Last Saturday afternoon about 3 or 4 o’clock, Robert Mitchell, a young man about 22 years old, was drowned in the Spokane River about 12 or 13 miles northeast of town. He was with a camping party consisting of A. Mecklenberg, Frank and Thomas Denison and Herman Smith, who had driven down to the river in the morning for the purpose of spending a few days hunting, fishing and camping out. ……(Aug 24, 1894, Last Sunday evening the body of Robert Mitchell, who was drowned in the Spokane River just three weeks before, was discovered by a couple of mining prospectors floating in the edge of the river, face downward, several miles below where the drowning occurred, just above Blake’s place…Accordingly the body was brought to town Tuesday morning, and after a careful examination Dr. Powell informed the jury that the wounds were merely the result of exposure to the weather, and the jury  (Foss Hayter, G. Blake, Wm Blake, George Barnhart and Joe Murphy with Justice Parks) at once brought in a verdict of “death by accidental drowning.” The body of the deceased was then placed in a coffin and buried in the Davenport Cemetery, among those present at the investigation and at the burial, being James Rowe, of Sprague, a cousin, and the only living relative of Mitchell living in the state. (LCT)  

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Aug 3, 1894

“infant” of Peter Hanson

Wilbur, Wash., Aug 4.—Word reached town this morning of the burning of the home of Peter Hanson, who lives four miles north of this place, and of the cremation of his child, who was alone in the house at the time the fire started, about 5 PM yesterday. Mr. Hanson was in the hay field and his wife was at work in the garden when the flames broke out, and before either of them could reach the house the whole building was aflame. Mr. Hanson made a desperate effort to save his child, a babe four months old, but to no purpose. Not a single article was saved. The origin of the fire is a mystery, as there had not been a fire in the house since morning. No insurance. (LCT)  

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Aug 10, 1894

“daughter” of J. E. Brace

The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Brace, of Sedalia, aged 16 months, died Thursday morning of some infantile trouble, and will be buried in the Davenport Cemetery Friday.  

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Aug 10, 1894

the late Robert Mitchell

A party of friends including a cousin of the late Robert Mitchell, recently drowned in the Spokane River, returned last Saturday evening from an unsuccessful search for the body of the drowned man. Giant powder was used in trying to bring the body to the surface, but resulted in failure. It is thought by members of the party that the body may have drifted far down the stream, as the current there is very swift.  

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Aug 24, 1894

F. W. Littlefield

Davenport Lodge #55 A.O.U.W.: The assessment this month was for the death of Brother F. W. Littlefield of Sprague Lodge #67, who died after a short illness of appendicitis, June 18th.  

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Aug 31, 1894

Mrs. William Robinson

Mrs. Wm Robinson died at her home southwest of town last Thursday evening of cancer of the stomach from which she has been a sufferer for some time, and the following day was buried in the Davenport Cemetery. Mrs. Robinson was a lady who was held in high esteem by all who knew her, and her death will be sincerely mourned by a great many friends. Her remains were followed to their last resting place by the entire community in which she lived, a large number from town also being in attendance. The bereaved husband and family have the sincerest sympathy in the sad loss that has befallen them. (LCT)  

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Aug 31, 1894

Mrs. Samuel Sharp

Mrs. Samuel Sharp, who lived near Larene, died last Friday after a long and lingering illness from that incurable and most relentless of diseases, consumption. For several months her life has been hanging by a slender thread, and on the morning of the above mentioned day her spirit took its flight. She had hoped to return to her old home in Illinois to spend her last remaining days, but was denied that boon by a turn for the worse in her ailment early in spring, from which she never sufficiently recovered to undertake the trip. She leaves a husband and several children, the youngest of whom is three years, to mourn their great loss. Her remains were placed in the cemetery near town Saturday, followed by sympathizing friends and neighbors. A P. Oliver conducted the funeral services. (LCT)  

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Sept 7, 1894

A. G. Osborne at Yakima

A G Osborne, special agent of the department of justice, died recently at North Yakima. He made Spokane his headquarters for a long time and spent the greater part of last winter in Wilbur, and was well known and highly esteemed. (LCT)  

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Sept 7, 1894

F. W. Littlefield

We notice in the Sprague papers that Mrs. F. W. Littlefield has received from Grand Receiver Amunds a draft for $2,000, the amount of her departed husband’s beneficiary in our order. The death of Brother F W Littlefield, and the prompt payment of his beneficiary, speaks well for our order, and is in accordance with its teachings and purposes, to care for the widows and orphans of our deceased members quickly and to some purpose. We knew when we paid our dollar on his death that every cent would go for that purpose and not to pay salaries as in an insurance company. CHP. (LCT)  

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Sept 14, 1894

Mrs. Emma Page

of Harrington

Sept 4, 1894, Mrs. Emma Page, wife of “Skip” Page, died at Harrington. The funeral was conducted at the residence by Rev. L. L. Burrill in presence of a large concourse of friends and neighbors.  

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(note this death date, paper is 1895, a good read)

Oct 18, 1894-date of death

Mary Julseth

“Avenge A Crime. The death of pretty Mary Julseth, the seventeen year old daughter of T. T. Julseth, a Rockford rancher, may yet be avenged. Ever since the story of the girl’s sad death was first published in the Chronicle, a strong effort has been made to ferret out the guilty party who attempted the abortion that produced the girl’s death. The chain of evidence is now about complete and it is likely that a warrant will be issued Thursday. The complaint was sworn to several days ago before Justice Munter by the dead girl’s father, but no warrant has yet been issued. The prosecuting attorney is investigating the case, and says the reason for delay in making an arrest is that he does not desire to investigate in court at the country’s expense what can be investigated before trial. Mary Julseth came to Spokane in July of last year and after being here several weeks discovered she was to become a mother. She communicated her fears to a woman and this person made her a decoction of gunpowder, juniper berries and gin, which eventually produced a miscarriage. Afterwards she rallied, and on Sept 15, when visited by a lady friend from Fairfield , she told of her misfortune and who had given her the medicine. The girl was then quite weak and hardly able to walk, but afterwards improved until Oct 1, when she was again taken down, and on Oct 18 died from the effects of the medicine.  Those who have worked up the evidence claim to have a strong case. They say that on trial they will show that the woman whose arrest they seek not only gave the girl the medicine which resulted in death but that she also was responsible for her condition, having introduced her to several different men in this city for immoral purposes.” (Spokane Chronicle: 1-21-1895; see also 1-25-1895)

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Oct 26, 1894

Isaac Depew

of Edwall

Mr. Isaac Depew died at his home near Edwall, in Lincoln County, Wash, on Oct 12, 1894, aged 76 years 9 months. Mr. Depew was born in New York State, and has been a resident of Lincoln County for the last 12 years, he having made his home with his daughter and her husband, Mr. John Logan and wife. The deceased has been in poor health for some time, being badly afflicted with asthma and dropsy. He was buried the 13th at Rockdale cemetery.  

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Nov 9, 1894

Miss Grace Switzer

Miss Grace Switzer, recently from Illinois, died Tuesday of this week at the home of J. D. Woodin near town and her body the following day was shipped back home for burial. (LCT)  

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Nov 16, 1894

Paul Beck

of Davenport

Paul Beck, who has been engaged in the butcher shop here in town for the past two or three years, died Monday morning of this week at the Dale House, of typhoid fever, after an illness of three weeks. He had been ailing for sometime before taking down with the fever, and for a week past had been seriously ill. His brother, Wm Beck, of Harrington, was present with him during all his sickness. Deceased was a young man 23 years old, and had scarcely ever experienced a day’s sickness in his life before. He had no other relatives in this part of the country. (Funeral Wednesday. LCT)  

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Dec 14, 1894

“mother” of Thomas children

The mother of the Thomas family who lived on the charity of the town a couple of years ago, died at Oakesdale a few days since, and the children are all sick and in destitute circumstances. (LCT)

 

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Jan 2, 1895-SC

Fred Hoyt

“Fred Hoyt, a farmer, was found dead yesterday afternoon by his little boys who were playing on his ranch about five miles west of town. He was lying face down in a snowdrift, frozen to death.  Hoyt had been in town last week, his brother-in-law said, and was on a spree, and it is supposed while returning home he became unable to walk and lay down about 100 yards behind his barn. It is thought this was Saturday evening. When found three days later the body was frozen solid and partly covered by the snow which had fallen. The coroner and Deputy Sheriff Cote this morning went to the place where the body was found to make an examination. They decided that no inquest was necessary. The deceased is a man of about thirty-five years and has a wife and children. He has been given to heavy drinking for a long time.” (Spokane Chronicle: 1-02-1895)

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Jan 11, 1895

Matt Sillman

Matt Sillman, who died at the asylum on Jan 8th and whose remains were taken through to Egypt for burial last Thursday, was one of  the early settlers of that vicinity. In the Spring of 1887 he moved with his family on to a homestead where they remained a number of years and which is still owned by the family. Deceased was 55 years, survived by a widow,  3 sons and 3 daughters. The funeral was in charge by Rev. Mollenhauer of Davenport.  

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Jan 18, 1895

“infant” Mecklenberg

The little child born to the wife of Moritz Mecklenberg last Saturday died Tuesday, and Mrs. Mecklenberg is lying at the point of death and not expected to live. (Dav. Times)  

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Jan 25, 1895

Mrs. Moritz Mecklenberg

Mrs. Moritz Mecklenberg, who was reported in our last issue as lying at the point of death, passed away the same (Thursday) evening, and Saturday was buried in the Harrington Cemetery,  Rev. Burrell conducting the funeral services. Relatives of the deceased wish to extend their thanks through the columns of the Times to all those who so kindly tendered assistance to the family in their distress. (Davenport Times)  

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Jan 25, 1895

Mr. James Hart

of Duck Lake Draw

Mr. James Hart, of Duck Lake Draw, one of the oldest settlers of that section, died on the 15th of this month at the home of his mother in Colorado, where he went about a month ago on a visit. He had been in poor health for some years, and recently went to Colorado hoping the change would benefit him. He leaves a wife and 5 children to mourn his loss, who are all on the farm on Duck Lake Draw. (Davenport Times)  

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Jan 25, 1895

Mary Julseth and infant

“For Murder. Susie Moder is Charged With an Awful Crime.  A warrant for the arrest of Mrs. Susie Moder, on the charge of foeticide, was issued by Justice Munter this afternoon, and officers have gone across the river to arrest the woman. The charge is that she gave Mary Julseth the medicine which killed her babe and afterwards caused her own death. The warrant is based on the affidavits of J J O’Keefe, a detective, who has been investigating the case.” (Spokane Chronicle: 1-25-1895)

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March 29, 1895

“infant” Ownes

The infant child of Mr. & Mrs. Thos Ownes near town (Davenport) died Wednesday morning.  

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March 29, 1895

Mrs. Emma Hanson

of Davenport

On Tuesday about two o’clock in the afternoon Mrs. Fred L Hanson, who has been very sick for some time, passed away. For more than a year she has been in very poor health, and only the best of care has prolonged her life so long. Recently her lungs became effected, and that together with other complications hastened her death. She came west three or four years ago, and shortly after was married to Fred Hanson, and at her death was scarcely more that 25 years old. She was an active member of the Lutheran church, and the funeral services were conducted by Rev. Mollenhauer at the Presbyterian church Tuesday morning at ten o’clock. The remains were carried to the grave by six members of the Masonic and AOUW lodges, of which her husband was a member, the lodges turning out in a body. Deceased had no relatives in the west but was much beloved by a large circle of friends, and leaves a sorrowing husband to mourn her loss. A large concourse of neighbors were out to pay a last tribute to the departed one. (Mt. View Cem, Davenport) 

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April 12, 1895

Hon. A. M. Cannon

of Spokane

The death of Hon. A. M. Cannon, the founder and builder of the city of Spokane, which occurred in New York City a few days ago, removes one of the most distinctly western characters in the state. His life was a series of ups and downs, but in the darkest hour his fortitude, his splendid courage never forsook him; he never faltered. He had a strong and vigorous mind, bold and daring in enterprise. He was the soul of honor in business dealings, and no other man in Spokane ever enjoyed the confidence of the laboring classes so completely. He gave liberally to charity and was loyal to his city always. When adversity came no man tried harder to stem the tide, but before the unequal task, he went down, and death claims him just as the shadow shows signs of passing away. But the name and fame of A. M. Cannon will always be associated closely with the name and fame of the city of Spokane.  

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April 12, 1895

Mrs. Mary A. Hansen

of Larene

Early Monday morning Mrs. Mary A. Hansen, wife of C. A. Hansen, who lives near Larene, died at her home after a brief illness of pneumonia, and Tuesday evening her remains were laid away in Mountain View cemetery near town…. Deceased was only 43 years of age, and was born in Virginia… (See Larene)  

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April 19, 1895 (note)

Dora Hansen

of Larene

Dora Hansen, 8 year old daughter of  Mrs. C. A. Hansen of Larene, died Tuesday and was buried the same evening. The funeral services were officiated by Rev. Eakin of the Methodist Church.  

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April 12, 1895 (note)

Mrs. Eliza Christie

of Larene

Mrs. Eliza Christie of Larene, aged about 60 years, died, burial in Davenport with funeral by Rev. Gow of the Presbyterian church.( Mt View Cemetery, Davenport) 

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April 26, 1895-notes

T. R. Moore

T. R. Moore of Egypt died Wednesday night, aged about 60 years. He came here in the spring of 1894 from Canada. The funeral was held from the Methodist church with burial in Mt View Cemetery. (LCT)  

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April 26, 1895-notes

Adelbert Cranford

Adelbert, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Cranford, aged 2 weeks 4 days, died Tuesday the 9th.  

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April 26, 1895

Mrs. A. C .Christy

A. C. Christy, whose wife died several weeks ago, mention of which was made in our last issue, wishes to correct the impression that may have gone out that his family was in impoverished circumstances. While they had not lived in affluence, they had always had plenty, and he and Mrs. Christy had traveled much during the past year or two on account of her health.  

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May 24, 1895 (not dead)

James Springer

of Stevens County

The report that James Springer died is false, but just as bad, he has left Stevens County and gone to Missouri.  

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May 24, 1895

Oliver B. Brown

of Crab Creek

Oliver B. Brown, an employee of R. M. Bacon, the Crab Creek rancher, died so suddenly Monday afternoon as to create suspicion that maybe he had committed suicide. Sheriff DeRackin and Dr. W. D. Buchanan went out to the ranch Tuesday morning, and after inquiring into all the circumstances reached the conclusion that death came from natural causes. Deceased was 31 years old and a native of Kentucky.  

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June 7, 1895

Charlie Fleming

of Northwood, Iowa

Coroner Parks is in receipt of a letter from  F. R. W. Fleming, of Northwood, Iowa, whose son was killed on the Great Northern road at Irby station a few weeks ago, particulars of which were given in these columns at the time so far as they were known. Mr. Fleming is anxious to learn all the particulars surrounding the death, and in the course of the letter makes this allusion to the boy: “Charlie was a good hearted, innocent boy, but of a roving disposition. He was on his way home and I was in hopes he would return and settle down and be more contented.” The funeral expenses of the deceased will be defrayed by the father and brother. (LCT)  

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June 21, 1895

Kittie Fitzpatrick

of Larene

Kittie Fitzpatrick, daughter of Bernard Fitzpatrick, of Larene, and sister of James Fitzpatrick, secretary of the Washington Fuel Company, of Spokane, died at Portland June 17th. She was taken sick several weeks ago, and her mother and brother were sent for, but she rallied and her friends thought she was recovering and her brother returned to Spokane. Last Saturday he received word she was worse and left at once for Portland, but arrived after her death. Miss Fitzpatrick was quite well known in Davenport, and her death will be regretted by many friends. (LCT)  

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July 5, 1895

Mrs. Lib Earl

Died.—At her home, nine miles northwest of Harrington, Mrs. Lib Earl,  aged 25 yrs 2 mos 18 dys. Deceased was born in Paradise Valley, Nevada, being a member of the well-known Johnston family of that vicinity, but moved to this state with her mother six years ago. Ten days prior to her death blood poison set in. Drs Powell and Leeson, of Davenport, were called and all was done that could be done to save her life, but all in vain. She died just as she had lived bearing her afflictions without a murmur. To know her was to love her for her sweet disposition. She leaves a husband, a mother, two sisters, three brothers, and two little sons aged 1 and 3 years, besides a host of friends to mourn her loss. The remains were followed to the McMillen cemetery by a large concourse of people where it was laid to rest and wait the coming of the Judgement Day. The bereaved ones have the sympathy of the entire community. R G T (LCT) (Edit: Elizabeth M Earl died on 18 June 1895, wife of Wm Earl; probate #839 @ Lincoln Co.)  

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July 5, 1895

Henry Kempkie

Henry Kempkie, the German farmer who died suddenly near Edwall, Wednesday, June 29, mention of which was made in last week’s Times, died from an attack of epilepsy, instead of from a dose of strychnine as was at first reported. Dr. Turney brought the stomach of the deceased to town the following day and made a careful analysis but found no sign of any kind of poison, and the coroner’s jury brought in a verdict of death from natural causes. It is presumed that death resulted from an attack of epilepsy. (LCT)  

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Aug 2, 1895

 Bobier, Maud 

"Death of Maud Bobier, niece of Mr and Mrs Wm Griswold of this place. Miss Maud Bobier, of Newport, Idaho was brought to the city Saturday night on the Great Northern train by her father and mother, and taken at once to the sacred Heart hospital. She has been suffering with diabetes, and it was hoped that with proper care and treatment she would recover. It was too late, however, and she died yesterday morning at four o’clock. She was but seventeen years of age and well and favorably known at Newport. She will be buried form Gilliam’s undertaking parlors this afternoon at two o’clock, the Rev T C Armstrong officiating. The remains will be laid to rest in Fairmont Cemetery.”LCT 

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Aug 16, 1895

Wm Shields

Wm Shields, father of the late Z W and R N Shields (of Earl district), died at Cottage Grove, Oregon on August 11, 1895. The deceased was born in Kentucky on April 7, 1799. The deceased leaves five children to mourn his loss…Mr. Shields moved to Oregon in 1851 and selected a home, on which most of the little city of Cottage Grove is now built…(LCT excerpt)  

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Aug 16, 1895

Maude Bobier

“We clip from the Colville Index the following: The many friends of the late departed Maude Bobier seek through the channel of your home and valuable paper to express the heartfelt sympathy for her sorrowing parents and many acquaintances whose fond memory….” (LCT)  

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     Sept 6, 1895

        Matt Klobuchar

"Matt Klobuchar, of Lincoln, died very suddenly at his home near that place last Saturday afternoon or evening. He had been at the Sister’s hospital at Spokane several months undergoing treatment for rheumatism and only returned a week prior to his death. He was taken with a congestive chill Saturday afternoon and his nephew, who has been waiting on him, became frightened and went home. When other members of the family returned he was found lying on the floor dead. The body was prepared for burial and sent to Father Dwyer at Medical Lake, where it will be interred.” (LCT: 9-06-1895)

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Nov 5, 1895

“daughter” Moulds

of Harrington

Robert Moulds buried a daughter on Thursday, Oct 31st. This is the second death in the family from typhoid fever within a few weeks. Three other children are sick with the fever, one of which is not expected to live. (LCT)  

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Nov 5, 1895

Mattie Warwick

of Moscow

There has been several typhoid victims near Moscow during the last few weeks. Mattie Warwick, aged 16, died Oct 31st, and another sister is reported very low. Edna Moulds also died Oct 30th, which was the second death that had occurred in the family during the month, and three more of the children are still very sick. (LCT) (Edit: 1998, Tombstone of Mattie E Warwick reads very clearly, “Mattie E, died Oct 31, 1896 aged 16 yrs 12 dys” in 7-15 of Hillcrest Cemetery at Harrington. Walter M died Jan 13, 1896 at 19 yrs 7 mos and 20 days. This is an error on the tombstone.)  

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Nov 15, 1895

?? E S Judd

“father” of Mrs. E Bassett

Mrs. E. Bassett received a message Tuesday morning apprising her of the death of her father, which had occurred at the Medical Lake asylum the night before, to which place he had recently been taken for treatment. Mrs. Bassett accompanied by Mrs. Anderson, left for the lake Tuesday afternoon. (LCT)  

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Nov 22, 1895

(Walter) Wesley Boyes

of Davenport

The Davenport community was shocked and horrified last Saturday evening by the startling announcement that rapidly spread over town that Wesley Boyes had been accidentally killed at the Big Bend Flour Mill…. Walter Wesley Boyes was born in Marine Co, CA, September 23, 1859, where he grew up to manhood. He came to Washington in 1887, and the day before he left his California home was married to Miss Neil, who accompanied him here, where they resided a year or two, and then went to the Palouse country, where they bought a farm and made their home. About a year ago Mr. Boyes secured employment in the Big Bend Mills at this place, where he has been steadily employed ever since. A wife and adopted child, father and mother, six sisters and two brothers survive to mourn their loss….At the conclusion of a short sermon well suited to the occasion, the immense throng led to the cemetery where the last rites were performed at the open grave according to the ritual services of the IOOF. (LCT) (City of Davenport shows: TS d. Nov 16, 1895, aged 36 yrs 1 mo 23 days; buried Block 92 Lot 1 in plot with John E Fraser, 1869-1952; Lulu Fraser 1876-1965; Haislip, graves in Block 92 ½; with the purchase of lots 1 & 2 by Mrs. Ida Reddick) 

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Nov 29, 1895

Mrs. Olive H. Cleary

Last Monday morning, after a short illness with pneumonia, Mrs. Olive H. Cleary died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. E. F. Elliot, in Sprague. Deceased was 55 years of age and leaves seven children to mourn the loss of a loving mother. Funeral services were conducted at the residence of County Supt E. F. Elliot yesterday afternoon by Rev. W. E. Sawyer of the Baptist Church. This morning the remains were taken to Spokane for interment in Greenwood Cemetery, beside those of her husband and daughter deceased.  

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Nov 29, 1895

John H. Bellinger

Word was received Wednesday morning that John H. Bellinger, who lived on a farm south of Reardan, had the same morning been found dead at his home by one of his neighbors. Mr. Bellinger was a well known citizen and possessed of considerable property. Death is supposed to have resulted from heart failure. (LCT)  

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Nov 29, 1895

Mrs. Bennet Sailor

Mrs. Bennet Sailor died at her home at Deep Creek, Monday, the 11th inst, and was buried Tuesday, the 12th. Quite a large number of people from Crescent attended the funeral as she was a member of the pioneer settlers of Crescent, and only moved away this year. (LCT)  

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Dec 13, 1895

Mrs. Tinsley of  Harrington

Mrs. Dysart was called to Spokane, Sunday, Dec 1st, by the illness of her mother, Mrs. Tinsley. The remains of Mrs. Tinsley were brought here from Spokane on Tuesday last and buried Wednesday beside her husband.  

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Dec 20, 1895

Madeline Moore

Saturday morning last, Madeline, the 3 year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. George Moore suddenly passed away after a short illness. Thursday evening she was taken quite sick with an asthmatic attack of some kind, and for a short time was quite distressed, but soon rallied, and apparently was nearly well when she was taken suddenly and violently ill again early Saturday morning, and expired before a physician could be summoned. It was an ailment that had manifested itself quite frequently in a milder form and was accompanied by heart trouble, which the attending physician stated was likely to terminate fatally at any time. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Eakin in the Methodist church Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Madeline was an exceptionally bright little girl of 3 yrs 7 mos…. (LCT)  

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Dec 27, 1895

Stella Mate Bassett

Sprague, WA, Dec 23.—Mrs. Stella Mate Bassett, wife of C. F. Bassett, died this evening, after two years’ suffering from paralysis. She was in her 40th year. Mrs. Bassett was a member of the Rathbone Sisters and an officer in the Rebekahs. The funeral services will take place from the Baptist church  

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Dec 27, 1895

Mrs. Petree of Moscow

Mrs. Petree died after a five weeks’ illness last Wednesday, leaving a husband and six small children to mourn her loss.

 

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Jan 3, 1896

Clara Petree

of Lord’s Valley

Died—Mrs. Clara Petree, wife of Mr. Cal Petree, of Lord’s Valley, Lincoln County, on Tuesday morning, Dec 17, 1895. Mrs. Petre was born Dec 15, 1864, and was married to Mr .Cal Petre Nov 14, 1882, which union was blessed with six children; two boys and four girls, the eldest 11 years and the youngest a baby of four weeks. She came to Lord’s Valley with her husband several years ago, and was among the early settlers of that valley. Her husband was a man of sturdy habits and they succeeded in making for themselves a comfortable home, and it was a happy family circle that death invaded and deprived of a mother’s care. A kind father and six little children are left behind to mourn for the departed. This sad death has cast a shadow over this entire community. During her illness the beloved mother and wife was given every care and attention. The best medical skill was secured, and kind neighbors rendered every assistance they could give. To her family Sister Petre was a thoughtful parent, ever looking after her children and administering to their wants with a mother’s love. The funeral was attended by a large number of friends and neighbors, who followed her remains to their last resting place to pay a last tribute to the dead…. The burial services were read in the home after which the remains were quietly conveyed to the Harrington Cemetery and peacefully submitted to the cold earth to await the resurrection morn. Rev W N O’Kelley (LCT)  

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     Jan 3, 1896 

       Charley Glasgow

“D M Glasgow received the sad intelligence by telegraph Monday of the death of his little nephew Charley, oldest son of James Glasgow, of Medical Lake, who was drowned in Silver Lake that morning while attempting to skate on the ice. Father and son had started out together for a skate, and had proceeded some distance from the shore, when the ice broke underneath their feet letting them down through into the freezing water. The father caught on to the edge of the ice and called for help. Mrs Glasgow rushed to their assistance and by throwing out one end of her shawl to her husband succeeded in pulling him out, but the little son went in underneath and his lifeless body was not recovered till some hours later. Mr Glasgow was n the water nearly a half hour before rescued from his perilous position, and was just about exhausted when drawn out. D M took the next train to the lake.” (LCT: 1-03-1896)

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     Jan 17, 1896

     Giles P Thomas

“Word was received in Wilbur Tuesday morning, of the death of Giles P Thomas, brother of E C Thomas, at David Quirk’s ranch on Wilson Creek. Mr Thomas had been troubled with heart disease all winter. Early Tuesday morning he felt a smothering spell coming on and at once hastened to the home of David Quirk, which is about a half mile distant. He only lived a few minutes after reaching Mr Quirk’s place. Mr Thomas was sixty-three years and one day old. He has been in this country a number of years, and his quiet, peaceful, bachelor life made him many friends. He was buried Thursday, Rev James H Beattie delivering the funeral sermon..” (LCT: 1-17-1896)

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Feb 16, 1896

Mrs. Clara Danforth

from Spokesman Review

“Mrs. Clara Danforth, wife of L E Danforth, adopted daughter of Mrs. M. J. McCoy, and cousin of Mrs. Sam Vinson, died yesterday after a lingering illness at the age of 24 years. She leaves one child, a daughter, aged 5 years. The funeral will occur from the Fernwell block tomorrow at 2 PM. Interment will be at Fairmont, and both the funeral and interment will be private. Mrs Dansforth was formerly Miss Clara Johnson, and immediately after her marriage in this city went to Davenport to live. She also lived in Portland, where she had many friends.”    "Clara was the first wife of my great-grandfather, Louis Everett Danforth (b.1868, d. abt. 1935).
I have a copy of Clara's death record from the Spokane City Register of Deaths, and the document indicates that she died on the 16th of Feb., 1896, at the age of 24, ....of tuberculosis. " J. Danforth, New Bedford, MA, relative.  

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Feb 28, 1896

“infant” Petree of Harrington

The infant child of Cal Petrie was buried on Wednesday afternoon. (LCT)  

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Feb 25, 1896

Mrs. Hurd

of Harrington

Mrs. Hurd died on Wednesday, Feb 19, from a stroke of paralysis. She leaves a son and a daughter, Mrs. Kane, to mourn her loss. The interment took place at 3 o’clock on Thursday afternoon. (LCT)  

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March 13, 1896

Mrs. George H. Moore

Mrs George H Moore, who has been lying at the point of death for several days, breathed her last Thursday at about half past seven o’clock in the morning. Her ailment was lingering consumption from which she had been suffering for nearly two years….She leaves a bereaved husband and little son to mourn her loss. Mrs George Moore was born in West Salem, Wisconsin, July 1, 1860, her maiden name being Mildred Myers. In 1888 she came west to Cheney, where she taught for awhile in the Cheney Academy. A year later she came to Davenport and had charge of the school for a couple of terms…June 16, 1891 she was united in marriage to Mr George H Moore. A daughter and a son were born to them, the little girl dying suddenly of croup a few months ago. An aged mother, a sister, and brother still live in Wisconsin. Deceased was a lady of refinement and superior intelligence who enjoyed the esteem and good will of all who knew her. The sympathy of the community goes out to the afflicted family in the hour of their trouble. Burial services will be held in the ME church, Friday at 2 o’clock. (LCT)  

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April 17, 1896

Mrs. John Oakley

of Davenport

Mrs. John Oakley, one of the first settlers of northern Lincoln County, passed away at her home in Davenport at 10 o’clock Monday forenoon, after a short illness of a few days. She was taken sick with pneumonia last week, and although quite sick, her condition was not thought to be dangerous, and her sudden death was a surprise and a shock to many of her immediate friends. The funeral services were held in the ME church Tuesday at 2 PM, and were conducted by Rev. Eakin, quite a number from Larene and Egypt being present. Mr. & Mrs. Oakley came to the state of Washington in the fall of ’80 and located on a prairie farm in the Egypt country, being one of the very first settlers in that section. There they have resided continuously ever since, until a couple of years ago when they moved into Davenport. Deceased was well known among the early pioneers of the northern part of the county, and enjoyed the esteem and respect of all. She was always a most zealous church worker, and took an active part and was the leading spirit in the organization of the first ME church in the Egypt and Larene districts, and in her death the church loses one of its most active and devoted members. A husband and foster son and daughter survive to mourn her loss. Mrs. Hannah Oakley was born in Chemung County, NY, Feb 12, 1832. She was married to John Oakley Nov 24, 1852. She was born again over forty years ago, and died April 13, 1896….Only last year her husband, then over 62 years old was re-claimed, and only a few months ago her son Bert was converted…..Her funeral was attended by the writer in the ME church of Davenport of which she has long been a member. The sermon was preached from I Samuel 20:18.—W. B. Eakin.  (Excerpt from Davenport School Sketches, “The attendance last Tuesday afternoon was diminished by one half, the scholars having attended the funeral of Mrs. Oakley.”) LCT  

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April 25, 1896

Mrs. Durie

of Harrington

Mrs. H. Durie, of Harrington, wife of station agent at that point, died at her home last Sunday of consumption after a lingering illness. She leaves a family of 8 children, and was highly esteemed in the community.  

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July 31, 1896

Charley Beers

of Larene

                Charley Beers of Larene died last Sunday and was buried in Mountain View Cemetery near town on Monday. He was the son-in-law of Mr. Parks of Larene and had a wife and one child.  

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Aug 28, 1896

Alf Anderson

Died a few miles south of town, Aug 15, of cholera infantum, Alf, infant son of Mr. & Mrs. Orlander Anderson, aged three months. The remains were followed by sympathizing neighbors and friends to the Davenport Cemetery, where the tiny form was laid to rest. And in truth it is at rest “for of such is the kingdom of heaven..”  (LCT) (Mt View Cemetery)  

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Aug 28, 1896

James Bassett Sr.

Mr. James Bassett, Sr., who went down to Costa Rica with a small colony from Lincoln County about a year ago, and who has been very ill for several months, died on August 7th, at a small place called Jimenez.  Mr. Bassett was well known in Lincoln County, being one of the early settlers, locating on a piece of land in the eastern part of the county in 1878, and changing his location to Egypt a couple of years later where he had resided continuously ever since until a year ago. He was born in England, Jan 13, 1824, and had traveled extensively in both hemispheres, having lived many years in Australia, California and Oregon. He had made and lost a great deal of money during his lifetime, but finally died a very poor man. He was well educated and a gifted man in many respects. He was educated for a Baptist minister, occasionally preaching during his latter years, and had few equals as a speaker and debater. He was twice married and leaves a wife and family of seven children, most of whom are grown. (LCT)  

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Sept 6, 1896

Joseph J. Shook

Mr. Shook, an old resident of this country, breathed his last at his home in north Egypt last Sunday morning at about 3 o’clock. Mr. Shook was somewhere near 75 years of age, and was very feeble. He had been in failing health for several months, but was confined to his bed only about one day preceding his death. His body was interred in the Frans Cemetery last Monday at 3 o’clock PM.  A large number of friends and sympathizers followed the remains to their last resting place. His daughter, Mrs. Johnson, of Coulee City, arrived a few minutes before the remains were taken from the house. The services were conducted by Mr. Bowers of Egypt. (Lincoln County Populist)  

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Sept 11, 1896

Mrs. J. J. Anderson

Mr. J. J. Anderson wishes to tender his sincere thanks to the many kind friends who so generously gave their assistance during the long last illness of Mrs. Anderson. (LCT) 9-04-1896  Mrs. J. J. Anderson who has been lying very ill with pneumonia for several weeks is still very far from well, her condition being little improved over what it was a couple of weeks ago. (LCT)  

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Submitted to the Lincoln County, Washington GenWeb on September 23, 2005

by Marge Womach

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