LINCOLN COUNTY OBITUARIES

                           1897 through 1899

                          Submitted by Marge Womach

 

Obituaries are taken from newspapers, probates, funeral home ledgers, and the county death register. 

These obituaries are listed chronologically, NOT alphabetically.  

  To search: Use your edit key, find in page to search for a surname

           This is NOT a complete listing, but a work in progress. Submit your relative to  the Lincoln County Co-ordinator

                  

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    March 10, 1897

  Hinckley, Joseph

“Administrator’s Notice. In the Superior Court of Lincoln County, State of WA, In the matter of the estate of Joseph A Hinckley, deceased. Notice is hereby given that letters of administration… Robert McLaren, Edwall, WA.” (LCT: 5-28-1897) “Joseph Hinkley. Probate #249, filed Feb 13, 1897, estate. Died: 10 March 1894. Property in City of Sprague. Adm. Robert McLaren.” (notes from Lincoln County Superior Court Probates)

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March 21, 1897

Henry Trombell

Henry Trombell, aged 59, died yesterday from paralysis, at the residence of Henry Brooks, Fifth and Mill streets (Spokane). The funeral will be held today from Smith & Co.’s undertaking parlors, at 2:30 PM, Dean Babbitt officiating. Interment will be at Fairmount. Mr. Trombell was formerly a business associate of Lucius T. Benham, of this city, they having been in business together in Chicago. Mr. Trombell had been in poor health for a number of years. The firm of Trombell & Benham established the firm of Benham & Griffiths in Spokane. (Spokane ___)  

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March 21, 1897

James Neer

James Neer, the 19 year old son of H. B. Neer, died yesterday at the family residence in Union Park. The funeral will be held Monday at 11 AM from the residence. Interment will be at Greenwood. (Spokane ____)  

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June 17, 1897

Mrs. F. McLellan

of Davenport

Mrs. Maggie, wife of F. McLellan of this place, died Tuesday evening about 6 o’clock at her home after an illness of less than two days. The immediate cause of her death was a stroke of apoplexy. For several years she had been afflicted with heart trouble and about three years ago was very seriously ill for several weeks at which time the physicians said she would not survive another attack. Since then, however, she had enjoyed reasonably good health, and Saturday and Sunday seemed unusually active and cheerful. Sunday night soon after returning from church, and while preparing to retire for the night, she suddenly fell to the floor unconscious. Dr. Turney, who had attended her in her previous illness, was hastily summoned and did all he could for her relief, but she never again fully recovered consciousness. Once or twice she rallied slightly but it was only temporarily and Tuesday evening she breathed her last. Mr. & Mrs. McLellan came to this county in 1889, and after a short residence on a farm moved to town where they had resided ever since, Mr. McLellan engaging in the general merchandise business with A L Smalley. Mrs. McLellan was much esteemed by all who knew her. She was a kind neighbor and devoted wife whose death will be a sad blow to the bereaved husband. She was a member of the Presbyterian church, and had always taken an active part in church work as far as her health would permit. Deceased was born in Nova Scotia March 20, 1852, moved to Boston in 1867, and to California in 1881, where she was united in marriage to F. McLellan. Her mother still lives at the old Nova Scotia home where she also has brothers and sisters. One brother resides in California. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. E. A. Walker at the Presbyterian church Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock. The services were simple and unostentatious, it being the wish of the deceased to avoid any seeming display. (LCT)  

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June 25, 1897-notes

Mr. Jessie P. Green

Mr. Jessie P. Green, after a sickness of only four days, died of pneumonia at the residence of his son-in-law, Mr. William Heberlein, last Friday the 18th inst. His home had been in Deep Creek, he was 51 years of age. Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery. (LCT)  

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Oct 8, 1897

Mrs. Hans Kupers

of Mohler

The sudden death of Mrs. Hans Kupers has cast a gloom over the neighborhood in which she lived, five miles south of Mohler.   Last Sunday Mrs. Kupers walked over to her neighbors, Mrs. Luteu, and five minutes after her return she lay a corpse in the yard in the Kupers homestead. Mrs. Kupers was 60 years of age, and was an affectionate, kind and loving wife and mother, generous and kind to all alike. Gus Shutter, a son by a former marriage, Hans Kupers, the husband, and Henry and Johnnie, two step-sons, are the only relatives in this part of the country to mourn her loss. A Neighbor. (LCT)  

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Oct 22, 1897

Alfred V. Hart

of Larene

  Mr. Alfred V. Hart, brother of Wm J. Hart, of Larene, who arrived last spring at his brother’s home from Bucoda, a town in the western part of the state, died Tuesday of this week, at 12:30 PM after a lingering illness of several years. Mr. Hart many years ago was afflicted with pleurisy, which slowly but gradually developed into other trouble which had been mistaken and treated for consumption for some time. Last spring he became so ill that he could no longer do anything for himself, and was brought from his home to Davenport by his brother, where a surgical operation was performed upon him, which afforded some relief for some time. He has been slowly declining for the last two or three months, however, and Tuesday noon quietly passed away at the home of his brother Wm Hart, near Larene. His remains were taken in charge by the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of which order he was a member. Funeral services were held at the ME church Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, at which time the members of the Rebekah and Odd Fellows lodges marched in a body from the lodge room to the church, where a brief sermon was preached by Rev. T. H. Fertig. At the graveyard the members of the order conducted the burial services, in which Hon J H Schively, visiting past grand, took the leading part. Deceased was born in Kingston, Canada, Dec 15, 1855, and with his father, brothers and sister came to Walla Walla in 1879. In 1880 he engaged in the lumber business at Bucoda, in western Washington, and the rest of the family came to Lincoln County. Eight years ago he was married and one child was born to the union, but mother and child had since died. Deceased was nearly 43 years of age at the time of his death and is survived by 3 brothers and the sister being at the bedside when he passed away.  

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Nov 12, 1897

A. C. McKay

of Wilbur

A tragedy was enacted near the Viola post office, between this place (Davenport) and Wilbur, last Thursday evening the result of  the criminal carelessness of a reckless if not vicious man who had been imbibing too freely. A young man was killed by a revolver in the hands of one H. A. Harrington, who now lies in jail charged with the murder of his companion. A. C. McKay, the victim of this unfortunate affair, came to Wilbur from Grand Forks about a couple of months ago, and last week came to Davenport with a view to locating here and opening up a tailor shop…It was learned the unfortunate man had a brother at Vancouver, BC…from him it is learned that the deceased was a native of Cannington, Ontario, and that he was 29 years and one month old at the time of his death….He leaves a father, 2 sisters and a brother in Ontario, Canada. He is said to have been quiet, well-behaved and by disposition inoffensive. Funeral services were held in the Presbyterian church at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon, the remains being followed to the cemetery by quite a number of townspeople, where the last tribute of the living was paid to the dead. (Also Coroner’s Inquest, same dated paper, LCT)(Date of Death: Nov 5th; Two witnesses: Moss Dodd & Wesley Sumerlin.)  

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Feb 4, 1898

Mr. L. J. Hutchings

Mr. L. J. Hutchings died at his home near Harrington last Monday night, after an illness of two or three months. He was afflicted with consumption, though the immediate cause of death was the bursting of a blood vessel, brought on by severe coughing. Deceased had for several years been a prominent resident of this county, and until recently was connected with the firm of Smalley & Co, of this city, which was known as Hutchings & Co. Early in the winter he contracted a bad cold, which developed into lung trouble, and for several weeks he had been declining rapidly. Last Saturday he was in Davenport, but was so feeble that he could get about only with great difficulty. He was unmarried, but a sister, recently from Michigan, was with him when he passed away. (LCT)  

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Nov 11, 1898

Robert Raymer Field

After an illness of two weeks with typhoid fever Robert Raymer, the two year old son of Mr. & Mrs. A. J. Field, died Sunday. The funeral occurred Monday afternoon. The many friends and acquaintances of the family throughout the county extend their sincere sympathy to the afflicted parents. We desire to especially express our earnest condolence to the young couple. We have known Mr. Field a number of years. He is a quiet, industrious, worthy young man, and the loss to him is a severe one. To stricken parents words of consolation are but a light relief in such an hour of suffering. Time alone can assuage the grief that comes with such a cruel blow, and the only gleam of comfort is a trust in that Higher Power that holds out the sweet hope of once more being united with the lost ones that have gone before. (LCT)  

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Nov 18, 1898

Henry Viets

of Harrington

The death of little Henry Viets was a surprise to many and it seems sad that this bit of humanity given, to brighten its parents’ lives, should be taken away. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Jesseph, assisted by Rev Edwards of Tyler. From the church a large number of the friends of the sorrowing parents followed the little body to its last resting place in the new cemetery. (Henry Veits was born June 9, 1898, per Hillcrest Cemetery records.)  

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Dec 2, 1898-scarletina

Several cases of scarletina are reported among the children about town. Two or three members of the family of J. B. Pershall are among the victims. (LCT at Davenport)  

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Dec 2, 1898

memorial

Some twenty members of Battery A marched to the ME church last Sunday morning and attended the memorial services held in memory of the soldiers and sailors who lost their lives in the late war with Spain. The attendance was not as large as it should have been, considering the nature of the service, but those present were treated to an eloquent and patriotic sermon, in which the officiating clergyman, Rev H. B. Creel, paid a high and glowing tribute to the American army and navy, and the administration that so ably directed the war to a successful termination. Those who had the pleasure of hearing the learned gentleman speak in warm terms of praise of the sermon.   

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Dec 30, 1898

Miss Minnie Howard

Crescent.—The vicinity of Crescent was saddened by the death of Miss Minnie Howard on Christmas Eve at 8 PM. She had been sick a long time. Lately she thought she was improving, and she was making preparations on Thursday last for a visit to friends at Spokane. On Friday she was suddenly taken very ill, which culminated in her death on Saturday. The funeral took place Monday morning at West Crescent school house, Rev. and Mrs. Bryans coming from Spokane to conduct the services. There were also present the Revs Taylor, Cromwell and Purchell, each and all taking part in the services. From the immense crowd that attended, the school house not being able to hold them all, the country around showed the very high esteem in which she was held and their wish to pay this last tribute of love and respect to her memory. (LCT)  

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Dec 30, 1898

Thos Ryan & Mr. Hayden

Last Sunday a gang of men that are working near Irby went up to Odessa on hand cars to celebrate Christmas and have a good time in general, some of them imbibing very freely of liquor. On the return trip four of the latter were on a handcar and when near Irby were run down by a freight train, which killed one outright, and cut both legs off of Thos Ryan, the foreman of the gang who was taken to Spokane but died while on the road. According to our information the man who was killed was named Hayden. The two who escaped were so drunk that they can tell nothing of how it happened but the most plausible story is that the boy left Odessa late in the afternoon, all pretty full and when near Irby were overtaken by a freight train. Two of the men must have jumped off the hand-car while Ryan, who was the only one who knew their danger attempted to remove Hayden who was lying on the car, but was too late, consequently both were caught. (Harrington Citizen)

 

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Jan 6, 1899

H. L. Gilbert

(Notes) The shocking news came to the people of this place Monday that Conductor H L Gilbert, of the N P road, had been accidentally killed at Pullman, Saturday. The deceased had many friends among the old timers in this place. He fell in front of a moving car, the wheels passing over his neck and severing the head from the body as though cut with an axe. With the exception of the right hand being crushed there was no other mutilation. (LCT)  

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Jan 20, 1899

Moultrie Davis

Crescent is again saddened by the death of Mr. Moultrie Davis of pneumonia yesterday, the 16th, at 8 AM. He will be buried today on his own land near the Spokane River. Mr. Davis was very highly respected and liked by all who knew him. He leaves a wife and five children who have the sympathy of all for their great loss. (LCT)  

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Jan 20, 1899

John C. Good

“(The reason that these resolutions were passed so long after the death of Mr. Good is that the local lodge only recently received official notice of his demise.) Whereas, Our esteemed and worthy brother, John C Good, who was a member of the 16th regiment of the regular US army, and also a member of Acacia lodge No 58…” (no date or location of death) (LCT)  

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Jan 27, 1899

John Trewick

Mr. & Mrs. Salisbury departed immediately for Sprague, where they attended the funeral, which took place last Friday. The Sprague Herald of the 14th says: “John Trewick, a pioneer of this section, passed away at his home in this city Tuesday evening after a few days’ illness. He had been troubled with asthma for several years and this is considered one of the causes of his death. The deceased was 73 years of age and was highly respected by all his acquaintances and the news of his death is a sad shock to his many friends here. The deceased was an employee in the NP car shops prior to their removal from this town. There is left to mourn the loss, a wife, four sons and three daughters, six of whom are married.” (LCT)  

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Jan 27, 1899-measles

Egypt.—School has been closed for two weeks on account of measles. Waukon.—The children of Mr. & Mrs. Walker, as well as Miss Ella Hoover, are down with the measles. No other losses being reported as yet in this neighborhood. (LCT)  

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Jan 27, 1899

Francis Marion Lighthizer

of Harrington

It becomes our sad duty to announce the death of Francis Marion Lighthizer, the thirteen year old son of Judge F. M. Lighthizer of this city. This sorrowful event occurred last Tuesday evening at the Deaconess Home in Spokane and furnishes another evidence that “in the midst of life we are in death.” Less than a month the little fellow was the picture of health….About two weeks ago the deceased was taken ill with the measles, as was also his brother, Lloyd, but as the disease is not considered dangerous nothing more than careful nursing was deemed necessary until last Saturday when the patient complained of pains in his side, Dr. Semple was called and pronounced it a case oappendicitis and on Sunday morning the child was moved from the house of Mr. & Mrs. Jaques, where he had been living while attending school, to the Deaconess Home. Dr Setters and E E Schafer of Harrington were called to the bedside of the little fellow…..During his last hours his father and brother were at his bedside. The deceased was born in Howard, South Dakota on the 23rd of July 1885 and was therefore 13 years 7 months and 5 days old at the time of his death. His father, F. M. Lighthizer, has lived in Harrington since its earliest history and is one of the most prominent and highly respected citizens of Lincoln County, besides whom the deceased also leaves a brother, Lloyd Lighthizer….He was endowed with one of the brightest intellects, for a child of his age, that we ever met and at the time of his death was considered a leader among his schoolmates at the Bryant school in Spokane. The Funeral. At the appointed hour a choir consisting of Mrs. E. E. Schafer, Mrs. V. L. Joslyn, Mrs. D. G. Miller, Miss McKay, A. Ross Graham, Dr. Setters, E. E. Schafer, Milt Davis and F. H. McKay commenced the services. Rev. L. E .Jesseph read a lesson from the Bible followed by a prayer by Rev. Edwards after which Rev. Jesseph delivered an earnest funeral sermon. All present were then permitted to pass through the room and take a last look at the deceased. The services as the grave were simple and appropriate. The pall-bearers were Herman Dyke, Earl Haynes, Geo Wheeldon and Hugh Haynes. (Citizen)  

Jan 27, 1899

Mrs. Ada Leonard

Mrs. Ada Leonard, wife of John Leonard, who resides on Hawk Creek, 15 miles north of Davenport, died on Jan 5, after an illness of ten days. Mrs. Leonard was taken down with pneumonia, but heart failure was the immediate cause of her death. The deceased was 41 years of age. Mr. & Mrs. Leonard were married March 14, 1895 at Tacoma and came directly to this county, settling on the place now held by Mr. Leonard. Mrs. Leonard was a devoted wife, a cheerful helpmate, and was highly respected by all who knew her. Her loss is not only a great bereavement to the husband, but is sincerely mourned by the whole surrounding neighborhood where she was held in such high esteem. (LCT)  

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Jan 27, 1899

Mrs. K. F. Stone of Oregon

John Stone, who has been employed upon the Citizen for the past two months, received a message this morning from his former home, Coquille City, Oregon, that his mother Mrs. K. F. Stone died last Monday at the age of 66 years. Mrs. Stone formerly lived in Harrington but moved to Coquille City in 1894. She leaves seven children to mourn her loss, Mrs. Henry Gohlman, Bud Stone, and John Stone of Harrington, and Mrs. Nannie Fellows, Mrs. D. F. Dean, Mrs. George Pike and Mr. W. T. Stone of Coquille City. When Mrs. Stone resided in Harrington she had many friends who still remember her as a noble hearted, loving mother and a true friend whose only thought was to live to make others happy.  

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Feb 3, 1899

Miss Jessie Moore

Last Saturday at 1 o’clock PM, Miss Jessie Moore, daughter of the late Thomas R Moore, died at the residence of her mother, in Egypt, after an illness of only a week. She was taken down with measles and it was complications growing out of  that dangerous disease that were the cause of death. The deceased was a most estimable young lady widely known and most highly respected throughout this part of the county, with a large circle of connections in Egypt and Davenport. Miss Moore was 25 years of age. She came to this county with her family from Ontario, Canada in 1883, when but a child, and grew up to womanhood on the place the family has constantly occupied since settling in the county. She was a bright young lady, and her amiable disposition endeared her to all of her acquaintances. She was a devout Christian, a loving daughter, a kind and sympathetic friend. Her death is sincerely deplored in the community in which she resided. Circumstances attending the death of Miss Moore were sad and singular. Her illness did not at any time seem serious, and her physician had no apprehensions of the result. Even up to a few hours before death there were no alarming symptoms. However, the young lady must have had a premonition of approaching death, because from the very first she insisted she would not recover. She had no fears of death, and spoke of the end without dread. She burned her letters, arranged her belongings and gave instructions for the distribution of her effects. At times her mind seemed deranged, and she suffered much from insomnia. Thursday night her physician prescribed a narcotic. She fell asleep, or into a stupor, at once, from which she never awoke, passing away quietly shortly after noon Saturday. The funeral took place from the ME Church in this place Monday at 10 o’clock, and the remains were followed to the cemetery by a large concourse of sorrowing friends and relatives. The deceased leaves a mother, the father having preceded her to the grave some three years, several sisters and brothers. Miss Mary Moore and Mrs. J. J. Inkster, of Davenport, are sisters, and Mr. William Moore, a brother. (LCT) The funeral of the late Jessie Moore took place from the ME church, Rev Creel preached a brief but appropriate and very touching sermon. (LCT)  

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Feb 3, 1899

infant of A. E. Speas

The infant son of A. E. Speas died last Saturday morning of inflammation of the bowels when only seven days of age. (LCT)  

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Feb 17, 1899

3 children of John Shaffer

We are sorry to hear that John Shaffer, living near the north line of the county (Adams Co), has lost three children in the past few days. (Ritzville Times) (These children were buried in the County Line Cemetery in Lincoln Co.)  

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Feb 17, 1899-diphtheria

At the front of a pretty little residence, on the brow of the hill overlooking the business center of the town a small flag has been flying for a week, bearing that word so dreaded by all parents “diphtheria.” This announcement was sufficient to cause a great deal of apprehension in the community, for there are few diseases so generally feared by physicians and laymen as diphtheria, a disease obstinate and tenacious, dangerous in the extreme at all times, contagious to a marked degree, and so uncertain as to leave doubts as to its termination long after the local ailment seems to have disappeared. The case in instance is a five year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Denny Moylan, and at present writing the child has every appearance of recovery. Every precaution has been taken to prevent the spread of the disease, and as no new cases have been reported it is possible that the malady will be confined to the family. We say family, as one or two of the children have had a slight touch of the disease. Dr. Turney informed a reporter that it is an acute case of malignant diphtheria, and, while recognizing the danger, believes that the disease can be stamped out in its incipiency. (LCT)  

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Feb 24, 1899

Helen Marie Moylan

Died.—Friday morning, Feb 17, 1899, Helen Marie, the eldest daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Dennis Moylan, aged 5 years and 17 days. The report of the death of little Helen Moylan came as a shock to the friends of the family in this community. The child had been low, very low, for several weeks. Taken down with scarlet fever, diphtheria followed and that dread disease was succeeded by inflammatory rheumatism. The attending physician was hopeful to the last, but the little one had not the vitality to rally from the complication of ailments. Little Helen was a bright, lovable child, the idol of the family, the light of the household (LCT)  

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March 10, 1899

Emma Dean Perry

Scarlet fever claimed another victim Friday last in the person of Emma Dean, the four year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. W. J .Perry. The child had been suffering from malignant scarlet fever for a number of days, but hopes were entertained of her recovery until within a short time before her death. The deceased was a bright, interesting child, the pride of fond parents. The family has the sincere sympathy of every parent in this sad loss of a household treasure. (LCT) On the morning of the 3rd of March, little Emma Dean Perry, youngest child of Mr. & Mrs. W. J. Perry, crossed the boundary into the summer land… The little one, though only four years of age, was a member of the infant class of the Presbyterian Sunday school. … (March 24th, 1899-LCT)  

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March 17, 1899-crisis

Mrs. J. P. Purchell

A message was received in Harrington late last evening from Davenport stating that Mrs. J. P. Purchell, sister of Frank and Ira Charlton, was not expected to live, Mrs. Purchell has been quite ill for some time with pneumonia which finally developed into quick consumption. Later—A telephone message received this afternoon reports her condition somewhat improved. (Citizen)  

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March 17, 1899

son of Mr. S. Carrolton

of Crab Creek

Died.—At Medical Lake the son of Mr. S. Carrolton. Mr. & Mrs. Carrolton were well known at Griffith having lived there a few years ago. Their friends sympathize with them. (Ritzville Times)  

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March 24, 1899

Nils G. Olson

Nils G Olson, one of the oldest and most respected citizens of Lincoln County, departed this life at the family home 10 miles west of Harrington last Tuesday morning. His last illness was of short duration but on account of his advanced age the end was not unexpected. In his last moments he was comforted by the presence of his devoted wife…. Nils G Olson was born in Sweden in 1835. He had therefore passed the 64th milestone in his life. When about 30 years of age he left his native land and journeyed to San Francisco where he engaged in business and later went to Nevada, where he was interested in mining. In 1875 he returned to Sweden, where he was married. In 1886 he returned to the US, coming directly to Lincoln County and locating a homestead upon the property where he lived until his death. He was a member of the Masonic lodge of Sprague and was an honest, upright citizen, a good neighbor and happy in his home relations, and his death is sincerely mourned by his family and profoundly regretted by his many friends. The funeral services, which were announced for Wednesday afternoon were not held until Thursday morning on account of the casket, which was ordered from Spokane, being shipped by mistake, over the Spokane Falls and Northern road and as a result another was ordered from Davenport but it was impossible to get it here until late Wednesday night. No services were held at the family residence but the following old-time friends and fellow Masons of the deceased drove out to convey the remains to the Presbyterian Church where the services were held: Judge Lighthizer, Arthur C. Billings, J. H. Abbott, J. N. Sirginson, Alex Thompson, and Wm P. Hill. Rev. Jesseph preached a short sermon after which Rev. J. C. Kirkman of Sprague offered a few remarks…(Others noted as in attendance: J. H. Linder, F. J. Stipps, T. A. Sirginson, Wm Alexander and Daniel Winter.) (Harrington Citizen) Mr. Olsen, of Harrington, father-in-law of Ex Treasurer Griffith, died this week and was buried Wednesday. (LCT of Mar 24, 1899)  

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March 24, 1899

Mattie Reinbolt

Mattie, the eldest son of Matthew Reinbolt, aged 14 years, passed away last Friday morning and was buried Sunday. The funeral was largely attended and the services were conducted by the German minister from Davenport. Mr. & Mrs. Reinbolt have the heartfelt sympathy of the entire community. (LCT) .. The lad had been sick some time with the measles, followed by an attack of pneumonia, which, in his weakened condition, proved fatal. (LCT-item)  

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Mar 31, 1899-estate

John Dorgan

Order to Show Cause...estate of John Dorgan, deceased; A. G. Mitchum administrator....

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March 31, 1899

James O’Connell

Last Saturday evening Loomis was the scene of a fatal shooting affray in which James O’Connell, better known throughout the mining districts as Pinnacle Jimmy, was instantly killed. The meager particulars of the tragedy were received by mail in a letter to C C May from Roy Bishop… Pinnacle Jim was shot and killed last night, March 8th, by John O’Herin. Both men were drunk and Pinnacle drew a knife and attempted to stab O’Herin, who drew a revolver and shot him four times… O’Herin says he shot him in self-defense. Jas O’Connell was an Irishman by birth. He spent years of his life in the mining districts of the Pacific coast. Some ten years ago he drifted into Loomis. He was put in charge of the Pinnacle, now Bunker Hill, group of mines, and in time relocated them. He has clung to the claims all these years, and had it not been for his cranky disposition, could have sold out several times for large sums of money…. his sudden death may stop further developments. (LCT)  

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April 7, 1899

Mack Cook

“Mack Cook Killed. Tuesday morning’s Spokesman Review contained the following article. Rossland, BC, April 3.—As the shifts were changing at 11 o’clock last night in the Centre Star Mine, Mack Cook and his partner, Ed Welch and Michael O’Hagan and his partner split their fuses, and sought safety.  O’Hagans shot went off, and it is supposed that Cook thought it was his and went to the face of the drift just in time to be killed by the explosion. His partner had gone to get ready for home.  O’Hagan in passing heard some one groan, and on investigation found it was Cook. He ran for assistance, and when he and other miners returned, Cook was dead. Cook was a single man, 36 years old, who was an old-timer in the camp. He has one brother in Maxwell, CA, and a sister in Missouri, where he was raised. Mack Cook at one time owned a ranch near Mohler and also worked for Chas Bethel. He went to the mines with Wm T Cormana a few years ago and the two have been prospecting together ever since. The body was taken to Maxwell, CA, for burial.” (Citizen: 7 Apr 1899)

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April 7, 1899

Beulah Finney

Beulah Finney, the 5 year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. George W. Finney died at Dr. Setter’s last Tuesday of tubercular meningitis of the brain. The child has been ill for some time and her death created little surprise to the many friends of the family, nevertheless, the end was a sad bereavement to the fond parents and they have the sympathy of the whole community. (Harrington Citizen)  

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April 7, 1899

Mrs. Laura Thompson

About 8 o’clock Monday evening, April 3, there passed away in this city a lady who has been an invalid and patient sufferer for many years. The deceased was Mrs. Laura Thompson, and she died in her room at the Columbia Hotel, surrounded in her last moments by a number of sorrowing relatives. Mrs. Thompson had reached the ripe old age of 82 years at the time of her death. She was born in North Carolina, and crossed the plains with her husband and family in 1864, settling in Nevada, where she continued to reside until 1880, when the family  removed to the Territory of Washington. She joined the Baptist Church at the age of 16, and continued a consistent member of that faith all her life. During her lifetime she raised a large family, and was always while possessing her faculties an active woman… Her husband preceded her to the grave several years ago. For many years the deceased was an almost helpless invalid. For the past 5 years she had not been down stairs at the hotel, and for the past year or two had hardly left her room. During all these years of helplessness she has been tenderly cared for by her daughter, Mrs. W. W. Griswold, whose beautiful devotion to a mother is worthy of the highest commendation. Mrs. Thompson was prepared for death, and welcomed the end as a relief from long suffering, and as a change to a higher and better life. Her only ailment was breaking down from old age. The deceased leaves three sons, Samuel Thompson, of Montana; Richmond Thompson, of Utah; and John Thompson of Nevada; and three daughters, Mrs. C.L. Young, of Cedar Canyon; Mrss Geo Bobier, of Newport, Idaho; and Mrs. W W Griswold, of this city. Also many grandchildren and great grandchildren. The funeral was held from the Columbia Hotel Tuesday, many friends of the family being present. The services were conducted by Revs Shields and Creel. (LCT)  

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April 7, 1899

Mrs. Wm Priest

(notes) Mrs. Wm Priest, of Edwall, upon whom Dr Whitney assisted in performing an operation last week, died at Sacred Heart hospital, Friday. The lady was very low at the time of the operation, and did not possess the vitality to rally. (LCT) We had a call from Hon Wm Priest, of Edwall, last Saturday. Mr. Priest lost his wife through the effects of an operation at the Sacred Heart hospital, Spokane. At the time we stated that she died from weakness. He desires to say that such was not the case. That her death was the result of the neglect of the hospital nurses to take proper care of the patient, and from the failure of the surgeon in charge to properly watch over his charge. This statement Mr. Priest says he is prepared to substantiate. (LCT-Apr 28, 1899)  

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April 7, 1899-burned

infant of Chas Doty

A shocking accident occurred at the home of Chas Doty, some seven miles northwest of town, last Sunday evening, about 8 o’clock. The clothing of an infant girl only one and a half years of age caught fire while the child was playing in front of the stove, and before the fire was extinguished her whole face, body and hands were frightfully burned. The nails of the right hand were burned off. Dr Whitney was summoned as soon as possible and he did all in his power to relieve the suffering of the little one. The doctor hopes to save the child’s life. (LCT)  

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Apr 28, 1899-surgery

Albert Davis

The first of the week, Albert Davis, living at Hunter, in Stevens County, was taken down with some ailment of the head, and became unconscious. Dr Whitney was sent for to consult with Dr McRae. Dr Whitney found the patient totally unconscious, breathing labouredly and evidently in a very critical condition. He had been that way for two days. It was decided that he was suffering from abscess. A hole was drilled in the skull back of the right ear and a large amount of puss removed. Mr. Davis was relieved at once, and a few minutes after the operation recovered his faculties and asked the amount of the bill. When Dr Whitney left Mr. Davis was in a  fair way to recovery. (LCT)  

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April 28, 1899

Mrs. David Glasgow

While not entirely unexpected the news of the death of Mrs. David M Glasgow, last Monday, produced a shock among the people and threw a gloom over the entire community. The lady had been ill for some time, and that illness was of such a nature that little hope was entertained of her recovery… She was the ministering angel of a happy household, a neighbor untiring in well doing, in her church a shining light of beautific Christianity. The funeral took place Tuesday afternoon under the direction of the Rebeccas, an order of which she was an active member. The outpouring of people showed the high regard in which the deceased was held. The funeral was the most largely ever known in Davenport. The ME Church was crowded as it has never been before. The services were conducted by Revs H B Creel, C R Shields and Jos Hepp, Mr. Creel, pastor of the ME Church, delivering a touching eulogy upon the virtues of the dead. The funeral cortage was an imposing one, the services at the grave being under the charge of Rebeccas and Odd Fellows. The maiden name of the deceased was Ada C. Jayne. She was born in PA in 1862, and was married to Mr. D M Glasgow at Davenport in 1890. She leaves a husband, 4 children, three sons and one daughter, the eldest seven years of age, the youngest an infant of only a few weeks; a sister, Mrs. P. Leipham; and a brother, W. H. Jayne, of this place. (LCT)  

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April 28, 1899

Mrs. Maggie King

Last Saturday afternoon, at the Sacred Heart Hospital, Spokane, Mrs. Maggie King, of Davenport, died from the effects of a surgical operation. The remains were brought back to this place Monday, and the funeral took place from the ME Church, of which the deceased was a member, the same afternoon. Mrs. King was the wife of Benjamin King, an old resident of Davenport and vicinity. The lady had been apparently in fairly good health up to some two months ago, when she was taken ill. He ailment baffled the skill of physicians for some time. At last the symptoms of the case gave evidence of abdominal tumor, and an operation was decided upon. The patient suffered intensely and was anxious to have the operation performed. She was taken to Spokane last Thursday and Dr. Thomas of this city operated upon her. It was found that a tumor did exist upon one of the intestines, but the cause of her suffering was obstruction of the bowels. She came out from under the influence of an aesthetics, but soon began sinking rapidly and died in two or three hours. Mrs. King was born in Jackson County, Iowa, and was 51 years of age at the time of her death. She came to Lincoln County with her husband, two daughters, Mrs. Clara Bryant and Mrs. Alma McKinnon, and five sons: Elmer, William, David, Alva and Arthur King, all residing in this place or vicinity. There are also 9 grandchildren. Mrs. McKinnon and Alva King are twins, born on the 4th of July, 1876, and her death occurred on the 31st birthday of her eldest son, E. E. King. The deceased was an exceptionally Christian woman, a sympathetic and kindly neighbor, a true and loving helpmate to a now sorrowing husband, and an affectionate and devoted mother. (LCT)  

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May 5, 1899

Chester Lowary

Mary Lowary

The family of Frank Lowary, living some nine miles east of Davenport, have been sorely afflicted recently. Some two or three weeks ago two young children of the family, a boy, Chester, 3 years, and a girl, Mary, aged 2 years, were taken down with that most dangerous of all

diseases, cerebral meningitis. It is an ailment that baffles the skill of all physicians, and is exceptionally painful  to the afflicted. Everything possible to relieve the little ones was resorted to, and several physicians were summoned, but all in vain. Both children were beyond hope for many days. Last week the little boy died and was buried Sunday in the Davenport Cemetery. At the time of the funeral the little girl was not expected to live from hour to hour, yet she lingered until Tuesday when death came to her relief. It was a sad case and the parents have the sympathy of the whole community. (LCT) Among the many visitors at this office during the week was James Lowary, father of Frank Lowary, who lives a few miles southeast of town. The senior Lowary was called from his home in Idaho by the recent illness and death of his son’s children. The old gentleman, although now a resident of a neighboring state, can claim being one of the pioneer settlers of this county. He crossed the plains from Kansas in 1879 with a large company of emigrants, some of who are now living in this vicinity. He located first in Oregon. Mr. Lowary moved into what is now Lincoln County in 1883, and resided here for a number of years. His children grew up to manhood and womanhood on the homestead near here. He is now living with one of his sons in Idaho. Time has bleached his hair and corrugated his countenance, but Mr. Lowary is still a man of considerable vigor. (LCT-May 26, 1899)  

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May 12, 1899

Joseph H. Hughes

We see by the Review that Joseph H. Hughes, of Republic, died in that camp last Sunday. Many of the old residents of Lincoln county remember Joe Hughes, and will learn of his death with feelings of genuine sorrow. Mr. Hughes was one of the old pioneers of Spokane County. Away back in the early ‘8o’s he located in Cheney, was for a time in John Davenport’s bank, afterwards opening a hardware store in that city in which he continued until Harrison was elected President ten years ago, when he was appointed receiver of the US land office at Spokane, which office he filled for four years. At the expiration of his term he was deputy state grain inspector. When the Republic excitement broke out in company with W S Strong he opened a bank at that place. Recently he was taken down with the grip, which resulted fatally. We have known the deceased many years and a kinder, warmer hearted, more generous gentleman we have never known. He had innumerable friends everywhere, one and all of whom will sincerely mourn his untimely death of this genial gentleman. (LCT)  

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May 19, 1899  

C. F. Phar

Mr. C. F. Phar, a pioneer of northern Lincoln County, passed away at his home about a mile east of Larene, Monday of this week, after an illness of only a few days. Pneumonia was the immediate cause of death. Mr. Phar with his family came to Lincoln County in 1882, and had  resided continuously on his farm about seven miles north of Davenport ever since. He had become a familiar figure in town, where he had supplied patrons with the produce of his orchard and garden for many years. An honest, industrious well meaning citizen, content with his humble lot, he passes to his reward esteemed by his neighbors as one who had ever shown himself worthy of their confidence and respect. Simple services were held at the home of the departed Tuesday by Rev. Creel assisted by Rev. Shields. The deceased leaves a wife and family of seven grown sons and daughters, all of whom are married excepting the youngest son who lives near the old homestead. He was born in Evansville, IN, Nov 2, 1830, married Nov 13, 1858 and had lived on his present farm about 17 years. He had identified himself with the Seventh day Adventists about 20 years ago, and was an earnest and conscientious advocate of the teachings of Adventism. Only two days before, his aged father-in-law, Isaac Leabo, had died from a stroke of paralysis, in his 84th year. The mother-in-law still remains, and is 80 years of age. (LCT)  

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May 19, 1899

Isaac Leabo

(from obit of C. F. Phar, paraphrased) Isaac Leabo died May 13th, 1899 at the home of his son-in-law, C. F. Phar, east of Larene. Isaac Leabo was 84 years of age and died from a stroke of paralysis. He is survived by his wife in the home, daughter, Mrs. C. F. Phar, and grown  grandchildren. (LCT)  

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May 26, 1899-estate

Harriet S Priest

Administrator’s notice... Wm M Priest.  

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May 26, 1899-Estate

David Mount

Notice... on this 3rd day of May 1899, G K Birge administrator of the estate of David Mount... 

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May 26, 1899-estate

Chas W. Travis

Notice to creditors... estate of Charles W Travis... administratrix of the estate... Rosella A Travis  

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June 2, 1899

Jas Snyder

Another old settler passed away and another old soldier answered the last roll call Monday when Jas Snyder, of Egypt, died after a long illness. The deceased has been almost helpless from a stroke of paralysis for some three years, and while his immediate death was not the result of that affliction, his demise was expected at almost any time. Mr. Snyder has lived in the county a dozen years. He was a man of probity, a good citizen and a kind and generous neighbor. Those who knew him best speak of him in terms of the highest praise. He was a veteran of the Civil War, having served throughout the rebellion. He was a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen of the Oregon jurisdiction, and it was his request that the funeral be conducted by that order. The funeral took place from the ME Church Wednesday. A large representation from the AOUW, a delegation of the members of the GAR, a squad of Battery A, and a large concourse of friends and neighbors followed the remains to the cemetery. (LCT)  

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June 2, 1899-smallpox

Monday morning word was received by Sheriff Gardner, over the telephone, that a case of smallpox had been discovered at Sprague… A Mrs. Donovan, living two and a half miles north of Sprague, was the victim. Upon his own authority Dr. Moore employed a skillful nurse, one that has had the disease, and placed the premises under strict quarantine. Dr. Moore reported that he heard of a case some miles west of Sprague and drove out to see the patient. It was discovered that the patient afflicted with the disease lived only a short distance over the line in Adams County. Moreover, he learned of several cases in the immediate vicinity…. (LCT)  

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June 16, 1899-smallpox

Larene.—We received notice from the sheriff a few days ago to close the school. Edwall.—The sheriff has served notice upon the picnic committees of the GAR at Moscow and that of the Edwall Brass Band, respectively, that the anticipated picnics must not be given, owing to the smallpox scare. Consequently neither of the picnics have been given. (LCT)  

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June 16, 1899-ill

St Clair Inkster

The latest word from St Clair Inkster is that he is slowly improving. His father, mother and brother are still with him and they expect to remove the sufferer to Davenport as soon as possible. (LCT; see also10-13-1899)  

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 July 27, 1899

  Miss Phoebe Stevens

“Obituary. Phoebe Stevens:  It would be hard indeed to exaggerate the worth of this good woman; She was busy about her Master’s work in Church, Young Peoples Society, and Sunday School. She was faithful to the last degree.  Miss Phoebe Stephens was bornd in Cleveland , Ohio , Aug 24, 1874 and died with brain fever and Spinal Meningitis, in Lincoln Co, Washington , July 27, 1889, in the triumph of a precious faith, made radiant in the realization of a blissful immortality. She was converted Feb 1899 and joined the Baptist church at Sherman , Washington and lived an active consecrated Christian until God said it is enough, come up higher.  She said when she was baptized, I felt happy when I was converted, but I believe I feel happier today. I have done my master’s will and now I am ready to die any time. She met death as calmly as if she was preparing to go to church. The funeral services were conducted by her pastor A J Gage. The text of the Sermon was Revelation 21:25.  Her body was laid to rest in the cemetery near Almira, to await the first resurrection when the dead in Christ shall arise.  The following present proved their friendship and sympathy by presenting many nice flowers.  Mrs  Ed Terry, Mrs M E Hay, Mrs E L Kracaw, Miss Ida Carter, Miss Emma Lyse of Wilbur , Wash. Mrs G E Kendall and Miss Florance Bosworth of Spokane, Wash.  Mrs Sarah Evans, Mrs Will Finley, Mrs R T Roberts and others, not known, of Almira.  The evidences of our religion are too plain to be mistaken. We know where Phoebe is gone. She is with Jesus. Safe, happy, pure and perfect. I her death the church has lost a faithful member and the Baptist young Peoples Union an earnest worker.  I wish I could say some words to cheer the broken hearted parents, brothers and sisters, but I am sure that no word but God’s can console them now.  You have far less occasion to mourn today than to rejoice. She was a child of the day.  By faith she discerned the blessed world where there is no night and with hope and patience waited for the morning.  It has now come to her. It dawned with unearthly splendor in that serenity of spirit and fullness of faith and triumph of hope which characterized her last days; it shone forth with celestial radiance in her soul while you watched the failing of the last sands of her life; and as she passed the dark valley the sun of Righteousness full-orbed and resplendent with divine glory broke upon her vision. She is now basking in the light of that sun which never sets and before which all darkness flees away. Far better than she ever was or ever could be on earth. Shall we wish her back again then? No. We wish not to have her back. We shall go to her.  Bereaved friends let that thought be your comfort in this hour of sadness. May you look to her devoted Savior in this hour of sorrow and  bereavement for the sweet, comforting spirit to help you bow in humble submission to this holy will.  A J Gage.”  (Obituary found in 2010 in an old book in Central Washington by Fred Pflugrath)

{Data from obit submitted: Birth: Aug 24, 1874; died July 27, 1899 in Lincoln Co, WA. Burial: near Almira. No record of death in Lincoln Co Auditor’s office, nor in probates. Rev Gage performed the last rites. Phoebe was shown on the 1880 Fairfield, Madison Co, Ohio census as the daughter of Flavius Stevens and his wife Sarah C Stevens. Others in the household: Flavius Stevens, age 38, Sarah C Stevens, 38,

Willie L Stevens, 15, George E Stevens, 12, John V Stevens, 10, Francis M Stevens, 7, Phoebe A Stevens, 6, Sarah M Stevens, 4,

And Ollie Stevens, 11 mos.}

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Aug 4, 1899

Burial of County Poor

Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the undersigned for the care and burial of the paupers of Lincoln County, WA, for a term of one year from the 15th day of August, 1899... J W Anderson, clerk of the board. (LCT)  

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Sept 8, 1899

infant of Jas Watson

Died.—Sept 4, 1899, the three year old daughter of Jas Watson, of acute enteritis. (Harrington Citizen)  

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Sept 15, 1899

Ben Akers

Ben Akers, who was a resident of this county many years ago, died at his home near Waterville, in Douglas County, last week. Mr. Akers was a typical western pioneer, and while he may have had his faults—and who of us is free of them?—he was true to his friends, open handed, with a warm heart under a rough exterior. (LCT)  

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Sept 15, 1899

George Condin

Last Thursday, a week ago, George Condin of Condin’s Ferry, was mowing hay with a mowing machine, and was carrying a double barreled shot gun across his lap, being prepared to kill some prairie chickens he had seen in the field. He had made a couple of rounds of the field when the gun accidentally slipped from his grasp, one of the hammers striking firmly against some part of the mower, discharged one barrel of the weapon, the charge taking effect in his left side below the heart, tearing a hole entirely through the unfortunate man. The team, being a gentle one, immediately stopped and George had presence of mind enough to climb down from the machine, pick the gun up and lay it across the machine, then he sat down and in a minute or more he lay on the ground. A man who was working with him in the field saw all these movements except the discharge of the gun, and thought nothing of seeing George in a sitting posture supposing something had gone wrong with his machine, until he was seen to lie down. Then it was his companion surmised something wrong and came running up. George told him he had been shot, and the gun had been so close to him when discharged, that it set his clothing on fire and Condin was pulling his clothes away to see the wound, which was a ghastly one. George’s companion immediately started to the house for assistance but on returning, they found George dead. He was buried on the reservation side of the river Friday. George Condin leaves a wife and two children. His brother, William Condin, was at Loomis when this accident happened, but was starting home, and did not hear of it until he reached a point near the river. It was found, on examination, that the top of the hammer of the fatal barrel had been broken off, so hard was the blow it received when it came in contact with the mower.—Wilbur Register (LCT)  

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Sept 15, 1899

George Gibson Glasscock

A very sad case of drowning occurred on the Perry Lamona place in the south part of the county, last Thursday evening, the victim being George Gibson Glasscock, the 3 year old child of Mr. & Mrs. Harrison Glasscock, old and well known residents of the county. The Glasscocks have been living on the old Bigham place, some 16 miles southeast of Harrington. Recently Mr. Glasscock had arranged to move to Harrington, and Thursday hauled his last load of goods to town. Desiring to bid Mr. & Mrs. Lamona goodbye, Mrs. Glasscock, accompanied by the child, whom the family had given a pet name of Joe, walked over to the Lamona home, which is about a half mile from the Bigham place. The yard of Mr. Lamona’s home slopes down to Crab Creek, which is some five feet deep at that point and crossed by a foot board. Little Joe and a three year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Lamona were out in the yard together. After a time a man working about the premises noticed the little girl on the creek bank alone. He spoke to the ladies, and a search for Joe was at once set on foot. Mrs. Glasscock did not at first feel alarmed, as she supposed the child might have returned home. The little girl would not, or could not, say what had become of the little boy. Search was continued, and the creek was dragged. When Mrs. Glasscock returned without finding the child, the men were called in from the field. After an hour and a half from the time the child was missed one of the men found the body in the creek only a few feet from the crossing. After the body was found the little girl said the boy had attempted to cross the creek and had fallen in. It was a very sad affair, and the family has the sympathy of the whole surrounding country. Mr. Glasscock is a brother of Mrs. J. W. Anderson of Davenport. The funeral took place at Harrington Saturday, and there was a very large attendance both at the church and cemetery. (LCT)  

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Sept 22, 1899

“infant” Davis

Minnie Davis has been held at Wilbur for child murder. The body of an infant was found in a vault, and it is alleged she threw it there. (Citizen)  

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Sept 22, 1899

Daniel Borden

Daniel Borden, a wood hauler near Spokane, suffered a horrible death in a runaway. The front braces of his wagon gave way, and the heavy load of wood carried Borden down beneath the swiftly moving wheels. (Citizen)  

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Sept 22, 1899

James Sutton

The dead body of Jas Sutton, a teamster, was found at Waverly. He had been poisoned and robbed. (Citizen)  

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Sept 22, 1899

Willie Gillespie

At the mouth of Moses Coulee, Willie Gillespie, a boy from Coulee City, was shot through the breast and killed. A party was at target practice, when the rifle in the hands of one of the contestants was discharged accidentally with the above results. (Citizen)  

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Sept 29, 1899

father of Ike Harris

Ike Harris was called to San Francisco Friday by a telegram announcing the death of his father in that city. (LCT)  

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Oct 13, 1899

Everett W. Becker

On Thursday of last week, Everett W. Becker, who had been working on a farm near Odessa, was taken sick and taken to Harrington. There his ailment was declared to be appendicitis. The poor lad was without means and it was some time before the proper authorities could take the case in hand. Becker was brought to Davenport Friday. Here word was received from the Portland Chamber of Commerce to take the patient to Spokane for treatment. Saturday morning Dr. Whitney and County Physician Moore took Becker to Spokane where he was operated upon the same afternoon, but he only survived the operation until the next morning. Young Becker enlisted in Co K, Second Oregon Volunteers, and served with the regiment during the campaign at Manila. During the summer he was discharged from the service on account of sickness, he having suffered greatly from dysentery. When he was operated upon it was discovered that one of the intestines was perforated, and that death was only a question of a very short time. (LCT)  

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Oct 13, 1899-estate

St Clair Inkster, Jr.

Executor’s Notice... estate of St Clair Inkster, Jr., deceased.... executor John James Inkster.  

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Oct 13, 1899-estate

Jeremiah Farmer Rice

Notice to creditors... estate of Jeremiah Farmer Rice, deceased,... executor, Edward Ensor   

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Nov 24, 1899

Maud Schuett

Maud, the four-year-old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Chas Schuett, died Wednesday afternoon of spinal meningitis after an illness of only three or four days. The Schuett family have had more than their share of misfortune of late. The father is suffering from consumption and four of the children have been down with scarlet fever. Now the most severe affliction is the death of the little child. (LCT)  

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Dec 15, 1899-surgery

John McCoy

Mr. & Mrs. John McCoy of Lord’s Valley accompanied Dr. Setters to Spokane last Monday where Mr. McCoy underwent an operation for appendicitis. He withstood the ordeal well and is getting along nicely. (Citizen) (Edit: Hillcrest Cemetery tombstone, John McCoy  Jan 17, 1859-Jan 12, 1900, Harrington)  

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Submitted to the Lincoln County Washington GenWeb on September 23, 2005

by Marge Womach

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